Fielding

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Harper & brothers, 1883 - 184 pages
 

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Page 161 - ... by composing, instead of inflaming, the quarrels of porters and beggars (which I blush when I say hath not been universally practised) and by refusing to take a shilling from a man who most undoubtedly would not have had another left, I had reduced an income of about 500 a year of the dirtiest money upon earth, to little more than 300 ; a considerable proportion of which remained with my clerk...
Page 104 - Familiar Letters between the Principal Characters in David Simple and some others...
Page 33 - A brushing fox in yonder wood Secure to find we seek; For why, I carried, sound and good, A cartload there last week. And a hunting we will go. Away he goes, he flies the rout, Their steeds all spur and switch ; Some are thrown in, and some thrown out, And some thrown in the ditch : But a hunting we will go.
Page 106 - ... which approached to frenzy, he found no relief but from weeping along with her ; nor solace when a degree calmer, but in talking to her of the angel they mutually regretted. This made her his habitual confidential associate, and in process of time he began to think he could not give his children a tenderer mother, or secure for himself a more faithful housekeeper and nurse. At least, this was what he told his friends ; and it is certain that her conduct as his wife confirmed it, and fully justified...
Page 94 - I marvel nothing so much as that men will gird themselves at discovering obscure beauties in an author. Certes the greatest and most pregnant beauties are ever the plainest and most evidently striking; and when two meanings of a passage can in the least balance our judgments which to prefer, I hold it matter of unquestionable certainty that neither of them is worth a farthing.
Page 135 - Bathurst, t'other night, carried a servant of the latter's, who had attempted to shoot him, before Fielding ; who, to all his other vocations, has, by the grace of Mr. Lyttleton, added that of Middlesex Justice. He sent them word that he was at supper ; that they must come next morning.
Page 168 - This discovery being made by accident, we completed the best, the pleasantest, and the merriest meal, with more appetite, more real solid luxury, and more festivity, than was ever seen in an entertainment at White's.
Page 62 - ... would, in my opinion, .do him very little honour; for sure it is much easier, -much less the subject of admiration, to paint a man with a nose, or any other feature, of a preposterous size, or to expose him in some absurd or monstrous attitude, than to express the affections of men on canvas. It...
Page 114 - In like manner, we shall represent human nature at first to the keen appetite of our reader, in that more plain and simple manner in which it is found in the country, and shall hereafter hash and ragoo it with all the high French and Italian seasoning of affectation and vice which courts and cities afford.
Page 163 - ... time, I did not undergo more than in all my distemper. At twelve precisely my coach was at the door, which was no sooner told me, than I kissed my children round, and went into it with some little resolution. My wife, who behaved more like a heroine and philosopher, though at the same time the tenderest mother in the world, and my eldest daughter followed me ; some friends went with us, and others here took their leave ; and I heard my behaviour applauded, with many murmurs and praises to which...

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