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Page 76 - ... and lest thou lift up thine eyes unto heaven, and when thou seest the sun, and the moon, and the stars, even all the host of heaven, shouldest be driven to worship them, and serve them, which the Lord thy God hath divided unto all nations under the whole heaven.
Page 37 - When the evening closed in, the difficulty and danger of walking about London became serious indeed. The garret windows were opened, and pails were emptied, with little regard to those who were passing below. Falls, bruises, and broken bones were of constant occurrence. For, till the last year of the reign of Charles the Second, most of the streets were left in profound darkness. Thieves and robbers plied their trade with impunity : yet they were hardly so terrible to peaceable citizens as another...
Page 37 - The machinery for keeping the peace was utterly contemptible. There was an act of Common Council which provided that more than a thousand watchmen should be constantly on the alert in the city, from sunset to sunrise, and that every inhabitant should take his turn of duty. But the act was negligently executed. Few of those who were summoned left their homes; and those few generally found it more agreeable to tipple in alehouses than to pace the streets.
Page 75 - If I beheld the sun when it shined, Or the moon walking in brightness; And my heart hath been secretly enticed, Or my mouth hath kissed my hand; This also were an iniquity to be punished by the judge: For I should have denied the God that is above.
Page 65 - O'er the uplands now to rove, While thy modest ray serene Gilds the wide surrounding scene ; And to watch...
Page 40 - ... receive more of the light which does arrive ? We do not conceive that our inability to answer the latter question prevents our knowing that the eye was made for seeing : nor does our inability to answer the former, disturb our persuasion that the moon was made to give light upon the earth. Laplace suggests that if the moon had been placed at a certain distance beyond the earth, it would have revolved about the sun in the same time as the earth does, and would have always presented to us a full...
Page 39 - That the light of the moon affords, to a certain extent, a supplement to the light of the sun, will hardly be denied. If we take man in a condition in which he uses artificial light scantily only, or not at all, there can be no doubt that the moonlight nights are for him a very important addition to the time of daylight. And as a small proportion only of the whole number of nights are without some portion of moonlight, the fact that sometimes both luminaries are invisible very little diminishes the...
Page 40 - Some persons might conjecture from this case, that the arrangement itself, like other useful arrangements, has been brought about by some wider law which we have not yet detected. But whether or not we entertain such a guess, (it can be nothing more,) we see in other parts of creation, so many examples of apparent exceptions to rules, which are afterwards found to be...

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