Witches, Midwives, and Nurses: A History of Women Healers

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Feminist Press, 1973 - Medical - 45 pages
19 Reviews
Women have always been healers, and medicine has always been an arena of struggle between female practitioners and male professionals. This pamphlet explores two important phases in the male takeover of health care: the suppression of witches in medieval Europe and the rise of the male medical profession in the United States. The authors conclude that despite efforts to exclude them, the resurgence of women as healers should be a long-range goal of the women's movement.

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Review: Witches, Midwives and Nurses: A History of Women Healers

User Review  - Oriyah Nitkin - Goodreads

Although I'm pretty well-versed in the history of obstetric care in the US, this pamphlet gave somewhat of a broader societal context and analysis of how this came to be. It's amazing to see how far ... Read full review

Review: Witches, Midwives and Nurses: A History of Women Healers

User Review  - Peggy - Goodreads

This book is a MUST READ for everyone in the birthing/nursing/doula/midwife community. I met B. Ehrenreich at a book signing for Nickle and Dimed, and I brought my old battered copy of Witches ... Read full review

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About the author (1973)

Barbara Ehrenreich is author of the 2002 New York Times bestseller Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America. She has written nearly twenty books, and has been a columnist for Time magazine and the New York Times. She has contributed to The Progressive, Harpers, The Atlantic Monthly, Ms., The New Republic, Z Magazine, In These Times, and Salon.com. Deirdre English is the former editor of Mother Jones magazine. She has written for the Nation, New York Times Book Review, San Francisco Magazine, S.F. Chronicle Sunday Magazine, Vogue, and public radio and television. Currently, English is a professor at University of California, Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism.

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