Social Network Analysis: A Handbook

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SAGE, Jan 26, 2000 - Social Science - 224 pages
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The revised and updated edition of this bestselling text provides an accessible introduction to the theory and practice of network analysis in the social sciences. It gives a clear and authoritative guide to the general framework of network analysis, explaining the basic concepts, technical measures and reviewing the available computer programs.

The book outlines both the theoretical basis of network analysis and the key techniques for using it as a research tool. Building upon definitions of points, lines and paths, John Scott demonstrates their use in clarifying such measures as density, fragmentation and centralization. He identifies the various cliques, components and circles into which networks are formed, and outlines an approach to the study of socially structured positions. He also discusses the use of multidimensional methods for investigating social networks.

Social Network Analysis is an invaluable resource for researchers across the social sciences and for students of social theory and research methods.

 

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Contents

Networks and Relations
1
Relations and Attributes
2
An Overview
5
The Development of Social Network Analysis
7
Sociometric Analysis and Graph Theory
8
Interpersonal Configurations and Cliques
16
Total and Partial
26
The Harvard Breakthrough
33
Components Cycles and Knots
101
The Contours of Components
108
Cliques and their Intersections
114
Components and Citation Circles
121
Positions Roles and Clusters
123
The Structural Equivalence of Points
124
Agglomerative and Divisive
126
CONCOR and BURT
131

Handling Relational Data
38
The Storage of Relational Data
49
The Selection of Relational Data
53
Points Lines and Density
63
Sociograms and Graph Theory
64
Egocentric and Sociocentric
69
Community Structure and Density
76
Centrality and Centralization
82
Local and Global
83
Centralization and Graph Centres
89
A Digression on Absolute Density
94
Bank Centrality in Corporate Networks
96
Components Cores and Cliques
100
Towards Regular Structural Equivalence
139
Interlocks and Participations
142
Dimensions and Displays
146
Distance Space and Metrics
148
Principal Components and Factors
153
Nonmetric Methods
157
Advances in Network Visualization
164
Elites Communities and Influence
165
Social Network Packages
175
Notes
181
Bibliography
193
Index
205
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

John Scott is Professor of Sociology and Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research at Plymouth University. He was previously Professor of Sociology at Essex University and Leicester University. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, an Academician of the Academy of learned Societies in the Social Sciences, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. An active member of the British Sociological Association, he has held the posts of Secretary, Treasurer, Chairperson, and President. His most recent publications are Conceptualising the Social World (Cambridge University Press, 2011), The Sage Handbook of Social Network Analysis (edited with Peter Carrington, Sage Publications, 2011), and Sociology (with James Fulcher, Oxfords University Press, 2011). His current work on the history of British sociology will appears as Envisioning Sociology. Victor Branford, Patrick Geddes, and the Quest for Social Reconstruction (with Ray Bromley, SUNY Press, 2013).

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