Transactions of the Royal Scottish Society of Arts, Volume 8

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Vol. 1- includes the proceedings of the society.
 

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Page 244 - All the rivers run into the sea; yet the sea is not full; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.
Page 61 - Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that: You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live.
Page 214 - In that day shall there be an altar to the Lord in the midst of the land of Egypt, and a pillar at the border thereof to the Lord.
Page 213 - ... retrograded under the action of the sea), and to fall in with the shore at Peluse, where the beach under the action of waves from the westward has advanced fifteen hundred feet since the days of Strabo, — ie since the closing of the ancient Pelusic and Tanitic branches. Although my arc is over one hundred degrees, I do not pretend to distinguish between the Great Pyramid and its immediate neighbors of the same group.
Page 3 - Arranged to meet the requirements of the Syllabus of the Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education, South Kensington.
Page 204 - Hast thou entered into the treasures of the snow? or hast thou seen the treasures of the hail, which I have reserved against the time of trouble, against the day of battle and war?
Page 103 - He desired to do something for the permanent good of the town " as a thanksgiving for the recovery of His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales from his dangerous illness in 1871.
Page 346 - ... to consume fully sixty gallons per head per day. 1. Quality of Water. All natural waters contain more or less saline ingredients, and all possess a greater or less amount of organic matter, besides gases, in solution. Neither the saline nor the organic matters are necessarily impurities. They may be natural constituents of wholesome waters. The saline matters are principally carbonate of lime (chalk), sulphate of lime (stucco), and chloride of sodium (common salt), with a small proportion of...
Page 348 - The same result takes place more slowly when carbonate of lime, in the form of shells or pieces of lime rock, are present in the filtering bed. A mixture of the peaty water with a hard water gives rise to a similar decoloration of the mixed liquid. We must distinctly draw the line between the above, or non-putrescent organic matter, and putrescent organic matter either of vegetable or animal origin. Marshy waters become impregnated with vegetable matter, which is liable to putrefaction, and hence...
Page 52 - The following donations were laid on the table, and thanks voted to the donors : — Skull of a New Zealander, presented by John Mitchell, Esq., Leith.

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