Venetian Ships and Shipbuilders of the Renaissance

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JHU Press, 1992 - History - 285 pages
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This major study by Frederic Lane tracks the rise and decline of the great shipbuilding industry of Renaissance Venice. Drawing on a wealth of archival sources, Lane presents detailed descriptions of the Venetian arsenal, including the great galleys that doubled as cargo ships and warships; the sixteenth-century round ships, which introduced dramatic innovations in rigging; and the majestic galleons, whose straight lines and greater speed made them ideal for merchantmen, but whose narrowness made them liable to capsize if loaded with artillery. Additional chapters detail the actual process of ship construction, the organization and activity of the craft guilds, and the development and management of the Arsenal.

 

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Contents

CHAPTER PAGE
1
Measures of Venetian Merchantman and Light Galley of the Sixteenth Century
3
Deck of a Trireme
11
OneMasted Galley Pictured in the Fabrica di
12
Great Galley Equipped for Pilgrim Voyage about 1485
18
A Page from the Fabrica di Galere the Storm Sails of a Merchant Galley about 1400
20
ThreeMasted Galley about 1445
23
Compartments in the Hull of a Merchant Galley
25
Some Famous Shipwrights
54
The Craft Guilds
72
Shipbuilders Tools
87
Diagram in the Fabrica
90
Diagram in the Instructione
91
The MezaLuna
94
Industrial Organization in the Private Shipyards
112
The Growth of the Arsenal
129

The Round Ships
35
Thirteenth Century Round Ship
36
OneMasted Cog
38
Carack
41
TwoMasted Ship of Fourteenth Century
43
Ship of 600 Tons about 1445
45
Galleon
51
The Management of the Arsenal
146
The Arsenal about 1560
173
Tables
235
Appendices
245
Bibliographical Note
268
Copyright

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