Homer in the Twentieth Century: Between World Literature and the Western Canon

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Barbara Graziosi, Emily Greenwood
OUP Oxford, Jun 7, 2007 - Literary Criticism - 336 pages
This collection of essays explores the crucial place of Homer in the shifting cultural landscape of the twentieth century. It argues that Homer was viewed both as the founding father of the Western literary canon and as sharing important features with poems, performances, and traditions which were often deemed neither literary nor Western: the epics of Yugoslavia and sub-Saharan Africa, the keening performances of Irish women, the spontaneous inventiveness of the Blues. The book contributes to current debates about the nature of the Western literary canon, the evolving notion of world literature, the relationship between orality and the written word, and the dialogue between texts across time and space. Homer in the Twentieth Century contends that the Homeric poems play an important role in shaping those debates and, conversely, that the experiences of the twentieth century open new avenues for the interpretation of Homer's much-travelled texts.

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Contents

PLACING HOMER IN
15
Tradition Reception and
27
Cultural
47
Copyright

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About the author (2007)


Barbara Graziosi is Senior Lecturer in Classics at Durham University. Emily Greenwood is Lecturer in Ancient Greek Literature at the University of St Andrews.

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