Roman Satire and the Old Comic Tradition

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 26, 2015 - History
Quintilian famously claimed that satire was tota nostra, or totally ours, but this innovative volume demonstrates that many of Roman satire's most distinctive characteristics derived from ancient Greek Old Comedy. Jennifer L. Ferriss-Hill analyzes the writings of Lucilius, Horace, and Persius, highlighting the features that they crafted on the model of Aristophanes and his fellow poets: the authoritative yet compromised author; the self-referential discussions of poetics that vacillate between defensive and aggressive; the deployment of personal invective in the service of literary polemics; and the abiding interest in criticizing individuals, types, and language itself. The first book-length study in English on the relationship between Roman satire and Old Comedy, Roman Satire and the Old Comic Tradition will appeal to students and researchers in classics, comparative literature, and English.
 

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Contents

TruthTelling Laughter 23
23
the Roman Satirists Know Old Comedy? 38
38
1
45
2
121
3
171
Conclusions 215
215
A Conclusion and Some New Directions 242 vii
242
Bibliography 251
251
Index Locorum 277
277
General Index 295
295
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About the author (2015)

Jennifer L. Ferriss-Hill is Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Miami. Her articles have appeared in the American Journal of Philology, Classical Philology, Illinois Classical Studies and Transactions of the American Philological Association.

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