Dracula

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HarperCollins, Sep 30, 2000 - Juvenile Fiction - 448 pages
43 Reviews
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Drama Hamilton Deane and John L. Balderston, from Bram Stoker's novel Characters: 6 male, 2 female 3 Interior Scenes An enormously successful revival of this classic opened on Broadway in 1977 fifty years after the original production. This is one of the great mystery thrillers and is generally considered among the best of its kind. Lucy Seward, whose father is the doctor in charge of an English sanitorium, has been attacked by some mysterious illness. Dr. Van Helsing, a specialist, believes that the girl is the victim of a vampire, a sort of ghost that goes about at night sucking blood from its victims. The vampire is at last found to be a certain Count Dracula, whose ghost is at last laid to rest in a striking and novel manner. The play is intended for all who love thrills in the theater. "Pure escape and great fun." N.Y. Post "An evening of high class fun." Newsweek

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lkmuir - LibraryThing

After discovering the double identity of the wealthy Transylvanian nobleman, Count Dracula, a small group of people vow to rid the world of the evil vampire. Illustrated notes throughout the text explain the historical background of the story. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KR_Patterson - LibraryThing

I was hesitant to read this because I was afraid it would forever alter my idea of the immortalized Dracula in ways I didn't want it to (because I love my notions of all the original monsters), and ... Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Bram Stoker was born in Dublin, Ireland on November 8, 1847. He was educated at Trinity College. He worked as a civil servant and a journalist before becoming the personal secretary of the famous actor Henry Irving. He wrote 15 works of fiction including Dracula, The Lady of the Shroud, and The Lair of the White Worm, which was made into film. He died on April 20, 1912.

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