Cobbett's Tour in Scotland: And in the Four Northern Counties of England: in the Autumn of the Year 1832

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Published at 11, Bolt court, Fleet street, 1833 - Agriculture - 264 pages
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Page 73 - Yes, the cows, pigs, geese, poultry, gardens, bees and fuel that arise from those wastes, far exceed, even in the capacity of sustaining people, similar breadths of ground, distributed into these large farms in the poorer parts of Northumberland. I have seen not less than ten thousand geese in one tract of common, in about six miles, going from CHOBHAM towards FARNHAM in Surrey. I believe these geese alone, raised entirely by care and by the common, to be worth more than the clear profit that can...
Page 104 - ... labourer that will delight you. Upon a steam-engine farm there are, perhaps, eight or ten of these. There is, at a considerable distance from the farm-yard, a sort of barrack erected for these to live in. It is a long shed, stone walls and pantile roof, and divided into a certain number of...
Page 111 - I think a great deal of the fine and well-ordered streets of shops ; of the regularity which, you perceive everywhere in the management of business ; and I think still more of the absence of all that foppishness, and that affectation of carelessness, and that insolent assumption of superiority, that you see in almost all the young men that you meet with in the fashionable parts of the great towns in England. I was not disappointed ; for I expected to find Edinburgh the finest city in the kingdom.
Page 102 - Tweed, which separates England from Scotland. I have come through the country in a post-chaise, stopped one night upon the road, and have made every inquiry, in order that I might be able to ascertain the exact state of the labourers on the land. With the exception of about seven miles, the land is the finest that I ever saw in my life, though I have seen every fine vale in every county in England, and in the United States of America. I never saw any land a tenth part so good. You will know what...
Page 84 - STEAM-ENGINES; here the labourers live in a sort of barracks : that is to say, long sheds with stone walls, and covered with what are called pantiles. They have neither gardens nor privies nor back-doors, and seem altogether to be kept in the same way as if they were under military discipline. There are no villages; no scattered cottages; no up-stairs; one little window, and one door-way to each dwelling in the shed or barrack.
Page 106 - It very frequently happens that the poor creatures are compelled to sell their cow for next to nothing ; and, indeed, the necessity of character from the last employer makes the man a real slave, worse off than the negro by many degrees ; for here there is neither law to ensure him relief, nor motive in the master to attend to his health or to preserve his life. There, chopsticks of Sussex, you can now see what English scoundrels, callingthemselves "gentlemen,
Page 110 - House; but I think a great deal of the fine and well-ordered streets of shops; of the regularity which you perceive everywhere in the management of business...
Page 101 - Amongst these rights are, the right to live in the country of our birth ; the right to have a living out of the land of our birth in exchange for our labour duly and honestly performed...
Page 117 - ... who have alternately assumed the reins of Government, it is most gratifying to us to be able to state that you, who it is well known will allow no compromise, no party considerations, to influence your opinions, have numerous and daily increasing friends. That their esteem and regard may long continue, is the sincere wish of Sir, Your most obedient servants...
Page 102 - I never saw any land a tenth-part so good. You will know what the land is, when I tell you that it is by no means uncommon for it to produce seven English quarters of wheat upon one English acre; and forty tons of turnips upon one English acre; and that there are, almost in every half mile, from fifty to a hundred acres of turnips in one piece, sometimes white turnips, and sometimes Swedes; all in rows, as straight as a line, and without a weed to be seen in any of these beautiful fields. "Oh ! how...

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