The autobiography, times, opinions and contemporaries of sir Egerton Brydges

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Page 250 - My thoughts are with the Dead, with them I live in long -past years, Their virtues love, their faults condemn, Partake their hopes and fears, And from their lessons seek and find Instruction with an humble mind. My hopes are with the Dead, anon My place with them will be, And I with them shall travel on • Through all Futurity; Yet leaving here a name, I 'trust, That will not perish in the dust.
Page 197 - I never hear the loud solitary whistle of the curlew in a summer noon, or the wild mixing cadence of a troop of gray plover in an autumnal morning, without feeling an elevation of soul like the enthusiasm of devotion or poetry. Tell me, my dear friend, to what can this be owing! Are we a piece of machinery, which, like the ./Eolian harp, passive, takes the impression of the passing accident; or do these workings argue something within us above the trodden clod...
Page 175 - Our notions upon this subject may perhaps appear extravagant, but if an individual is really of consequence enough to have his life and character recorded for public remembrance, we have always been of opinion that the public ought to be made acquainted with all the inward springs and relations of his character.
Page 250 - ... are with the Dead ; with them I live in long-past years, Their virtues love, their faults condemn, Partake their hopes and fears, And from their lessons seek and find Instruction with an humble mind. My hopes are with the Dead ; anon My place with them will be, And I with them shall travel on Through all Futurity ; Yet leaving here a name, I trust, That will not perish in the dust.
Page 3 - Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer, Willing to wound, and yet afraid to strike ; Just hint a fault and hesitate dislike...
Page 250 - My days among the Dead are past; Around me I behold, Where'er these casual eyes are cast, The mighty minds of old : My never failing friends are they, With whom I converse day by day. With them I take delight in weal And seek relief in woe ; And while I understand and feel How much to them I owe, My cheeks have often been bedew'd With tears of thoughtful gratitude. My thoughts are with the Dead ; with them I live in...
Page 241 - Through glens untrod and woods that frowned on high, Two sleeping nymphs with wonder mute I spy ; And, lo, she's gone ! — In robe of dark green hue, 'Twas Echo from her sister Silence flew, For quick the hunter's horn resounded to the sky ! In shade affrighted Silence melts away. Not so her sister. — Hark ! for onward still With far-heard step she takes her listening way, Bounding from rock to rock, and hill to hill.
Page x - Bath made on a lady he was intimately acquainted with, in speaking of her to Sir Joshua Reynolds. His lordship said that he did not believe that there ever was a more perfect human being created, or ever would be created, than Mrs. Montagu. I give the very words I heard from Sir Joshua's mouth ; from whom also I heard that he repeated them to Mr. Burke — observing that Lord Bath could not have said more, ' And I do not think that he said too much,
Page 197 - ... rose, the budding birch, and the hoary hawthorn, that I view and hang over with particular delight. I never hear the. loud, solitary whistle of the curlew in a summer noon, or the wild mixing cadence...
Page 175 - With what endeavours and what efficacy rule over them; with what resistance and what suffering sink under them ? In one word, what and how produced was the effect of society on him; what and how produced was his effect on society?

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