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T. G. B. . . THE REV. PROFESSOR BONNEY, G. B. H. . . PROFESSOR G. B. Howes.
F.R.S.

W. H. THE REV. WILLIAM HUNT.
G. S. B. . . G. S. BOULGER.

W. H. H. THE REv. W. H. HUTTON, B.D. W. B-T... MAJOR BROADFOOT.

T. B. J... THE Rev. T. B. JOHNSTONE.

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@ In the List of Writers in the forty-second volume, the words the late should be cmitted tofore the name of the RET. THOMAS OLDEN and inserted before the name of the REV. CANON VENABLES.

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OWENS, JOHN (1790-1846), merchant, in partnership as a producer of cotton yarns), and founder of Owens College, Manchester, the latter made the generous suggestion that, the first and for four years the only college instead of leaving it to a man who had more of the Victoria University, was born in Man- than enough, he should found a college in chester in 1790. His father, Owen Owens, Manchester where his principles might be a native of Holywell in Flintshire, went to carried out. He died unmarried on 29 July Manchester when a young man, and started 1816, at his house, 10 Nelson Street, Chorlin business as a hat-lining maker, ultimately ton-upon-Medlock in Manchester, aged 56 becoming, with the aid of his son John,currier, years, and was buried in the churchyard of furrier, manufacturer, and shipper. He mar- St. John's, Byrom Street, Manchester, where ried in his twenty-fifth year Sarah Hum- the whole family rest. By his will, dated phreys, who was six years older than himself; 31 May 1845, he bequeathed the residue of and he died in 1814, aged 80. John was the his personal estate (after bequests to relaeldest of three children, the other two-also tives, friends, charities, and servants amountsons-dying in childhood. He was educated ing to 52,0561.) to certain trustees, 'for the at a private school (Mr. Hothersall's) in the foundation of an institution within the partownship of Ardwick, Manchester. He was ad- liamentary borough of Manchester, or within mitted early into partnership with his father two miles of any part of the limits thereof, (1817), and the business greatly increased. for providing or aiding the means of instructAccording to his principal clerk, he was ing and improving young persons of the male considered one of the best buyers of cotton sex (and being of an age not less than fourin the Manchester market. A keen man ofteen years) in such branches of learning and business, it was also his custom to purchase science as are now and may be hereafter calicoes and coarse woollens, which were usually taught in the English universities, packed on his premises and shipped to China, but subject, nevertheless, to the fundamental India, the east coast of South America, and and immutable rule and condition that New York, importing hides, wheat, and other the students, professors, teachers, and other produce in return. He opened agencies in officers and persons connected with the said London and some of the provincial towns, and institution shall not be required to make any in Philadelphia, U.S.A. He also speculated declaration as to, or submit to any test whatin railway and other shares, and lent money soever of, their religious opinions; and that on them as security. Owens's health was deli- nothing shall be introduced in the matter or cate, and he led a private and almost secluded mode of education or instruction in reference life, taking no ostensible part in public questo any religious or theological subject which tions. He had, however, from his youth up- shall be reasonably offensive to the conscience ward deeply interested himself in the subject of any student or of his relations, guardians, of education, and strongly disapproved of all or friends under whose immediate care he university tests. Accordingly, when, towards shall be. . . . Subject as aforesaid, the said the end of his life, he offered his fortune to his institution shall be open to all applicants for friend and old schoolfellow, George Faulkner admission without respect to place of birth, (1790 ?-1862) [q. v.] (with whom he was and without distinction of rank or con

TOL. SLUI.

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dition in society.' The net amount realised neighbouring landowner. Having acquired from the legacy was 96,6541. 118. 6d. Ac- a taste for theatricals, he communicated to cordingly Owens College was founded, and Oliver Goldsmith his desire to go on the was opened in 1851. The first premises, which stage, and the latter introduced him to Garwere in Quay Street, Deansgate, had formerly rick about 1771. He had a handsome and been the residence of Richard Cobden. They commanding figure and sang well, having were at first let to the college by George received tuition from Worgan and Arne, and Faulkner, the first chairman of the trustees, was quite successful when he appeared in and were in 1854 presented by him to the the provincial theatres. Of his many parts institution. In 1871 the Owens College was the best was Teague in the Committee incorporated by act of parliament, and in and Major O'Flaherty in the West Indian,' 1873 the college was installed in the fine and he was already popular when he made buildings in Oxford Street, which were erected his London début at Covent Garden in 1774. by public subscription from the designs of He was admitted a member of the famous Mr. Alfred Waterhouse, R.A. Owens's “Literary Club'on Goldsmith's recommengenerous bequest has been largely increased dation, and in 1774 married Jane Mill, the by later endowments.

daughter of a tradesman of Shrewsbury, [Thompson's Owens College, Manchester, and a distant relative of the Mills of 1886; personal information.] J. T. K. Hawkesley in Shropshire. The first child of

the marriage was Sydney, the afterwards OWENS,JOHN LENNERGAN(f.1780), celebrated Lady Morgan' see MORGAN, actor, was born in Ireland, to which country Sydney). Owenson appeared on the Dubhis performances seem to have been confined. lin stage in October 1776, and remained He succeeded Henry Mossop [9.v.] at Smock there some years, becoming part-proprietor Alley theatre, and was held as Zanga in the of Crow Street Theatre. În 1785, after a * Revenge' to have approached more nearly quarrel with his manager, he opened the than any other actor of the time to his original. Fishamble Street Theatre, but returned in All that survives concerning him is a repu- less than a year. Subsequent attempts to tation for persistent inebriety. Coming on carry on theatres at Kilkenny, Londonderry, the stage as Polydore in the Orphan,' he was and Sligo were failures, and in 1798 he rehissed for obvious intoxication. Advancing tired from the stage. He died in blin at to the front of the stage, he delivered with a the house of his son-in-law, Sir Arthur scowl the following words in his soliloquy, Clarke, at the end of May 1812, and was • Here I'm alone and fit for mischief,' and buried at Irishtown, outside the city. He put himself in a fighting attitude. This has been placed only a little lower than John Hibernian form of apology served the desired Henry Johnstone (q. v.] as an Irish comedian, end, and Owens was allowed to finish his and he was also a capable composer, the performance. His failing gradually drove well-known airs of Rory O'More and My him from the stage. On seeing John Kemble Love's the Fairest Creature' being attributed announced for Zanga, he begged some money to him. His kindness of heart is illustrated of a stranger, who asked him his name. To by the generosity he extended to Thomas this inquiry he answered with tragic solem- Dermody [q.v.] His only literary producnity, • Have six years' cruel absence extin- ' tions are a song preserved in T. C. Croker's guished majesty so far that nought shines · Popular Songs of Ireland' and · Theatrical here to tell you I'm the real Zanga ? Yes, Fears' (12mo, Dublin, 1804), a long poem, sir, John Lennergan Owens, successor to after the manner of the Rosciad, published Henry Mossop.' The dates of his birth and under the signature of ‘R. N. O.' death are unknown.

[Brit. Mus. Cat. ; Thespian Dictionary; Fitz[Thespian Dictionary; Doran's Annals of the patrick's Lady Morgan, 1860; Barrington's PerStage, ed. Lowe.]

J. K. sonal Sketches, ii. 207; O'Keeffo's Recollections, OWENS, OWEN (d. 1593), divine. (See i. 354; Life of Dermody, 1806.] D. J. O'D. under Owen, Joun, 1580-1651, bishop of OWENSON, Miss SYDNEY (1783 ?St. Asaph.]

1859), novelist and traveller. See MORGAN, OWENSON, ROBERT (1744-1812), ac- ;

SYDNEY, LADY. tor, was born in the barony of Tyrawley, co. OWTRAM, WILLIAM, D.D. (1626 Mayo, in 1744.

His parents were poor 1679), divine, son of Robert Owtram, was people named MacOwen, which their son born at Barlow, near Chesterfield, Derbyshire, afterwards englished into Owenson. lle on 17 March 1625-6 (Notes and Queries, 7th was primarily educated at a hedge-school, ser. xi. 205). On 13 May 1642 he was adand acted for a short time as steward to a mitted a sizar of Trinity College, Cambridge,

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where he graduated B.A. in 1645. He was [Biogr. Brit. v. 3289; Cooke's Preachers’ As. afterwards elected to a fellowship at Christ's sistant, ii. 254; Life of Thomas Firmin, p. 14; College, where he graduated M.A. in 1619. Granger's Biog. Hist. of England, 5th ed. v. 41; In 1655 he held the university office of junior Kennett MS. 52, f. 228; Kennett’s Register and proctor, and in 1660 he was created D.D. (LE Chronicle, p. 813 ; Le Neve’s Fasti (Hardy), ii. NEVE, Fasti, ed. Hardy, iii. 624). His first 93, iii. 361;, Newcourt's Repertorium, i. 463, church preferment was in Lincolnshire, and 922; Nichols's Leicestershire, vol. i. pt. ii. p. 466 ; he subsequently obtained the rectory of St. Autobiography of Symon Patrick, 1839, pp. 82, Mary Woolnoth, London, which he resigned lib.'xiv. pp. 5, 37; Sharp's Life of Archbishop

245, 246; Peck's Desiderata Curiosa, vol. ii. in 1666. He stayed in London during the Sharp, i. 16 ; Silvester's Life of Baxter, iii. 19, plague in 1665 (Addit. MS. 5810, p. 290). On 78, 131; Ward's Life of Dr. Henry More, p. 78; 30 July 1669 he was installed archdeacon of Hist. of Westminster, ii. 52 ; information kindly Leicester. On 30 July 1670 he was installed supplied by W. Aldis Wright, esq., LL.D.] prebendary of Westminster, and he was also

T. C. for some time rector or minister of the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster. He died on OXBERRY, WILLIAM (1784-1824), 23 Aug. 1679, and was buried in Westminster actor, the son of an auctioneer, was born on Abbey, where a monument, with a Latin in- 18 Dec. 1784 in Moorfields, facing Bedlam. scription, was erected to his memory (DART, According to a memoir supplied to Oxberry's Westmonasterium, ii. 620). His will, dated · Dramatic Biography,' he was well educated, 5 Nov. 1677, was proved in London 3 Sept. and placed at the age of fourteen under the 1679 (P.C. C. 119, King). He bequeathed care of Stubbs, declared to be an artist of emilands in Derbyshire and Lincolnshire, and nence.' Showing no aptitude for design, he left legacies to the children of his brother was transferred to a bookseller's shop kept Francis Owtram, deceased, and of his sisters by one Ribeau, and thence to the office in Barbara Burley and Mary Sprenthall, both Tottenham Court Road of a printer named deceased, and Jane Stanley, then living. An Seale, an amateur actor. Here his diselaborate catalogue of his library was com- position for the stage was fostered, and piled by William Cooper, London, 1681, 4to. he is depicted studying Douglas in one Owtram's widow lived forty-two years after corner, while in another his master was him, until 4 Oct. 1721 (CHESTER, Westminster rehearsing Glenalvon. At a stable near Abbey Registers, pp. 197, 301).

Queen Anne Street, and subsequently at the Owtram was aí nervous and accurate writer,' theatre in Berwick Street, he took parts such and an excellent preacher, and he was re- as Hassan in the ‘Castle Spectre 'and Rosse puted to have extraordinary skill in rabbi- in ‘Macbeth.' After he had made a public nical learning. Baxter speaks of him as one appearance in a malthouse in Edgware his of the best and ablest of the conformists. indentures were in 1802 cancelled, and he His principal work is “ De Sacrificiis libri duo; appeared under Jerrold, at the Watford quorum altero explicantur omnia Judæorum, theatre, as Antonio in the Merchant of nonnulla Gentium Profanarum Sacrificia ; Venice.' A performance of Dan in ‘John altero Sacrificium Christi. Utroque Eccle- Bull' revealed some talent in low comedy, siæ Catholicæ his de rebus Sententia contra and, after appearing at Sheerness, and playing Faustum Socinum, ejusque sectatores de Richard III at Godalming, he joined, as fenditur,' London, 1677, 4to, dedicated to low comedian, the company of the Worthing, Thomas Osborne, earl of Danby. An Eng- Hythe, and Southend theatres, under Trotlish translation, entitled “Two Dissertations ter. For some time subsequently he made on Sacrifices,' with additional notes and in- an occasional appearance in Shylock, Hasdexes by John Allen, was published in 1817. san, and other characters. More frequently

After his death Joseph Hindmarsh pub- he was seen in parts such as Lope Tocho lished under his name six · Sermons upon in the Mountaineers,' and Old Frost in Faith and Providence, and other subjects,' the Irishman in London. In 1806 he marLondon, 1630, 8vo. It was stated that these ried, at Southend, a young actress playing discourses had been taken down in shorthand, subordinate parts in the company, named but they are not genuine. In order to do Catherine Elizabeth Hewitt. In the followjustice to his memory, his relatives caused ing year he attracted the attention of Henry "Twenty Sermons preached upon several oc- Siddons (q.v.], by whom he was recommended casions' to be published from the author's to the Kemble management at Covent Garden. own copies,' by James Gardiner, D.D., after- At a salary rising from 51. to 81. a week, he wards bishop of Lincoln (2nd ed., corrected, made his first appearance on 7 Vov. 1807 as London, 1697, 8vo). Prefixed to the volume Robin Roughhead in. Fortune’s Frolic. His is a portrait of Owtram, engraved by R. White. performance was cold, constrained, and

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