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part the third ; the government alarmed at the truths it inculcated, prosecuted the publisher Mr. D. I. Eaton, who after experiencing the most brutal treatment from the Judge, Lord Ellenborough, was found guilty and sentenced to eighteen months imprisonment, and to stand in the pillory. It is impossible to think of those legal barbarities, perpetrated as they are in behalf of Christianity, without feelings of the most pointed indignation. It is impossible to view those proceedings without wishing for the destruction of the church which requires them, and the state which inflicts them; they are equally criminal, equally deserving of our abhorrence, and the sceptre and the cross are at once the signs of their authority, the emblems of their faith, and the instruments of their cruelty.” To the high displeasure of Almighty God; to the great scandal and reproach of the Christian religion; to the evil example of all other persons, and against the peace of our said late Lord the King, his crown and dignity.

SECOND COUNT.---And the jurors aforesaid, upon their oath aforesaid, do further present, that the said Jane, the wife of Richard Carlile, further impiously and profanely, devising and intending as aforesaid, afterwards (to wit), on the eighteenth day of February, in the first year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the fourth, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Brilain and Ireland, king, defender of the faith, at London aforceaid, in the parish and ward aforesaid, unlawfully and wickedly did sell, utter and publish, and cause and procure to be sold, uttered, and published, a certain other scandalous, impious, blasphemous, and profane libel, of and concerning the Holy Scriptures, and the Christian religion, containing therein amongst other things certain scandalous impious, blasphemous, and profane matters and things of, and con, cerning the holy Scriptures and the Christian religion, in one part thereof, according to the tenor and effect following: (that is to say)—“ Before the people can be blest with, and cordially receive a perfect government, and a pure and equit. able code of laws, they must reject the Bible, (meaning the holy Bible) as being the word of the true God; and also totally disbelieve the divinity of Christ. (meaning our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ) For while they are inflexible in the Christian Faith, there is no possibility of establishing equitable laws, or even acting in a private way justly towards each other; for, by the doctrines of the Bible (meaning that part of the holy Bible which is called the Old Testament) and New Testament, nature is subverled; and where nature is

destroyed, ho perfection can possibly remain.

I was in my youthful days taught to read the Bible, (meaniug the holy Bible) and I continued to read and reverence it (meaning the holy Bible) more tban twenty years, and was as tenacious of it (meaning the holy Bible) and the Christian religion, as any one could be, except at some few short intervals, when ths reason that nature had given me was allowed to act, but priestcraft had carefully provided a sufficiently powerful enemy to defeat the efforts of this divine light of nature, until I had the courage to read the “ Deist” and “ Paine's Age of Reason, And I do most affectionately intreat all my fellowcountrymen to throw far from them that boak (meaning the holy Bible) which scarcely contains any thing but blasphemy, profaneness, lies, and unequalled absurdities; and instead of the Bible, (meaning the noly Bible) I would, above all things, have them read attentively the Age of Reason" and the “Deist,” which are books replete with perspicuous truth, According to the doctrines of the Bible, (meaning the holy Bible) no crime can be looked upon with half the blackness and horror that the natural conscience of man describes it; for in that book, (meaning the holy Bible) the most atrocious murders are palliated ; and in many instances, considered as the very essence of the service of the true God! It is the Bible (meaning the holy Bible) and such books, that have degraded and made men far worse than the most hateful part of the brute creation--to the high displeasure of Almighty Godto the great scandal and reproach of the Christian-religionto the evil example of all other persons--and against the peace of our said lord the King, his Crown, and dignity.

THIRD COUNT.-And the Jurors aforesaid, upon their gath aforesaid, do further present, that the said Jane, the wife of Richard Carlile, further impiously and profanely, devising and intending as aforesaid, afterwards (ta wit), on the same day and year last aforesaid, at London aforesaid, in the parish and ward aforesaid, unlawfully and wickedly did sell, uller, and publish, and cause to be sold, uttered, and published, a certain other scandalous, impious, blasphemous, and profane libel of, and concerning the holy Scriptures and the Christian religion, containing therein amongst other things, divers scandalous, impious, blasphemous, and profane matters and things of, and concerning the holy Scriptures and the Christian religion, in one part thereof, according to the tenor and effect following: (that is to say)-“ For in that book, (meaning the holy Bible) the most atrocious murders are palliated ; ant

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in many instances, considered as the very essence of the service of the true God." And in another part thereof, according to the tenor and effect following: (that is to say)-" It is the Bible, (meaning the holy Bible) and such books, that have degraded and made men far worse than the most hateful part of the brute creation”--to the high displeasure of Almighty God-o the great scandal and reproach of the Christian religion---to the evil example of all other persons, and against the peace of our said lord the King, his Crown, and dignity.

THOMAS FAIR, sworn,

A true Bill on both Counts.

TO CORRESPONDENTS:

We are requested by Mr. Davison to explain the circumstance of the £5, which headed the subscriptions received by him, it appears to have been a misunderstanding on the part of Mrs. Carlile. At the time Mr. D. took the receipt of Mrs. C. for the sunis he liad received, he was the printer of the Republican, and he inquired if there were any other subscriptions for insertion. This suni of £s was mentioned, which it since. appears has been actually received, and Mr. Davison instead of keeping it distinct from his own account, put it to the lead under his own name, wliich has led to mistake. As we were anxious to notice the Nottingham hoax; we enquired whether there was auy other sum fictious in the advertisement, and received for duswer the statement which went furth in No. I. of the present rolume.

A few copies of the old edition of PANE's PoliticaI, WORKS remain on sale at £1 1s. complete in two volumes. As tliey are likely to be out of priut for two or three years, those persons who may be anxious to possess them should lose no time, as at present there is no other ineans of completing sels but by mixing different colours and kinds of paper.

Various Portraits of Paine may be also had at 55, Fleet: street.

SUBSCRIPTIONS.

. & d. Wm. Courts, Hoxton

0 36 A few Priends to Religious Liberty, from Edinburgh

10 0 0 A Friend to the Cause

0 1 0 Sixth Payment of the Weekly Pence of a few Friends lo Civil

and Religious Liberty, P. Christie, Collector Mr. Guilelnius, of Porissa

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REMARKS ON THE MOTION OF MR. BROUGHAM

IN THE COMMONS HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT, ON THE 5TH INST, ON THE APPLICATION OF THE DROITS OF THE ADMIRALTY.

In the eye of the advocate of a monarchical government this motion must have appeared very important, but as we view it as one of the triding bubbles which will ever attend this form of government, our remarks will of course be brief. Mr. Brougham brought forward his motion in an able and luminous speech, the subject of which he appeared to be a perfect master of, and detailed many circumstances which were particularly interesting, as an exposure of the villainy of a corrupt monarchical government. The ground of his motion was, that the misapplication of various sums of money from the fund which is called the Droits of the Admiralty, made it imperative on that House to take those funds into their own management. One of the circumstances which was brought forward in proof of the corrupt misapplication of the money of those funds and the violation of all law, justice, and public decency on the part of the king, alias, the King's Ministers, was a grant made to Sir Home Popham. The particulars are these. It appears that Sir Home, at the conclusion of the war, in conjunction with a Mr. Charnock of Ostend, fitted out a large vessel for the East Indies, and that Sir Home, who had no longer an enemy to contend with, was determined to make war on the revenue of his king. He makes a trip to the East Indies, and loads home with tea and other exciseable articles; and having previously prepared a country seat on the coast of Kent, he is discovered by the vigilance of our coast waiters

in emptying the contents of his ship into his countryseat. The vessel and cargo is seized, and Mr. Charnock of Ostend finds it a bad speculation ; but to compensate Sir Home Popham for the very unpleasant feeling, this circumstauce must have occasioned him, his Majesty makes bim a grant of upwards of £50,000 from the Droits of the Admiralty !!! Is it not very probable that the king and his ministers were joint partners in the profits which were expected to ensue from this smuggling transaction. We know very well that Pitt and Dundas were detected in smuggling a cargo of spirits from Guernsey for their own private use, and it appears that smuggling, according to example, is an honourable and dignified employment, although our prisons are filled with

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the poor fellows who for want of other employment are engaged in working the vessels at small wages. It was very recently discovered that three transports in the pay of the country were employed in bringing large quantities of contraband goods from France, among which were a quantity of such pictures as the Vice Society are in the habit of prosecuting for the use and amusement of the then Regent. Nearly the whole of the Aristocracy were engaged in this transaction ; and a Major Barrow, who either detected the fraud or came home from France with it, was immediately packed off to North America that he might not be called on to give evidence on the occasion. It appears that those things are very common in high life, and when an opposition member is sufficiently rude or unruly to menlion it in the house, there is some charm which hushes the measure by common consent. Not one of the ministers would make the least observation on Mr. Brougham's notice of Sir Home Popham ; but Mr. Canning, who as the offspring of corruption and prostitution, was bold enough to support them both by his eloquence, as gems and jewels in the Royal crown; and, like a true antiquarian, he would protect them was it only for the sake of their antiquity. The Chancellor of the Exchequer espoused that horrible doctrine, that the act of king-killing might be sometimes virluous, and that the murder of the father of the present Emperor of Russia, was a most fortunate circumstance: he ought to be hung, beheaded, and quartered, for proclaiming this doctrine to the world. What must Ferdinand of Spain feel when he reads such a doctrine promulgated by an English Chancellor of the Exchequer?

However, the motion of Mr. Brougham was the first trial of strength in the new Parliament, and out of upwards of 400 members there were only 155 with him, leaving a majority of more than 100. So that the people of England are now plainly told by this House of Parliament, that the king, his ministers, and themselves the majority, might smuggle what they like, might spend the public money as they like, and prolect whaí abuses they like, notwithstanding the provisions of the statutes in that case made and provided. Flere, Britons, is a specimen of the Reform you are to expect from the Hopourable House,

EDITOR.

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