The Law Review and Quarterly Journal of British and Foreign Jurisprudence, Volume 1

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O. Richards, 1845 - International law

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Page 470 - I have certainly a very strong opinion upon it. The more I consider the case, the more satisfied I feel that I stated the general principle correctly in Langton v. Horton when I said that a creditor might, under his judgment, take in execution all that belonged to his debtor, and nothing more. He stands in the place of his debtor. He only takes the property of his debtor, subject to every liability under which the debtor himself held it.
Page 353 - Confusion of progeny constitutes the essence of the crime ; and therefore a woman who breaks her marriage vows, is much more criminal than a man who does it.
Page 266 - I have but to show you to the multitude which in a few hours will fill these streets and that park — and possibly Carlton House will be pulled down — but in an hour after the soldiers will be called out, blood will flow, and if your Royal Highness lives a hundred years it will never be forgotten that your running away from your home and your father was the cause of the mischief ; and you may depend upon it the English people so hate blood that you will never get over it.
Page 211 - ... that principle, which gives to the owner of the soil all that lies beneath his surface ; that the land immediately below is his property, whether it is solid rock, or porous ground, or venous earth, or part soil, part water ; that the person who owns the surface may dig therein, and apply all that is there found to his own purposes at his free will and pleasure ; and that if, in the exercise of such right, he intercepts or drains off the water collected from underground springs in his neighbour's...
Page 208 - A man is not to sell his own goods under the pretence that they are the goods of another man ; he cannot be permitted to practise such a deception, nor to use the means which contribute to that end. He cannot, therefore, be allowed to use names, marks, letters, or other indicia by which he may induce purchasers to believe that the goods which he is selling are the manufacture of another person.
Page 199 - That, when the access and use of light to and for any dwelling-house, workshop, or other building, shall have been actually enjoyed therewith for the full period of twenty years without interruption, the right thereto shall be deemed absolute and indefeasible...
Page 44 - It should, however, be observed that when the law makes use of the term malice aforethought, as descriptive of the crime of murder, it is not to be understood merely in the sense of a principle of malevolence to particulars, but as meaning that the fact has been attended with such circumstances as are the ordinary symptoms of a wicked, depraved, and malignant spirit; a heart regardless of social duty, and deliberately bent upon mischief.
Page 382 - HE the said AB DOTH hereby for himself, his heirs, executors and administrators, covenant with the said CD, his...
Page 465 - And be it further enacted, that every will shall be construed, with reference to the real estate and personal estate comprised in it, to speak and take effect as if it had been executed immediately before the death of the testator, unless a contrary intention shall appear by the will.
Page 211 - ... but that it rather falls within that principle, which gives to the owner of the soil all that lies beneath his surface; that the land immediately below is his property, whether it is solid rock, or porous ground, or venous earth, or part soil, part water; that the person who owns the surface may dig therein, and apply all that is there found to his own purposes at his free will and pleasure...

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