The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Death of George the Third, Volume 2

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Page 288 - So help me God, I will keep all these articles inviolate, as I am a man, as I am a christian, as I am a knight, and as I am a king crowned and anointed*.
Page 63 - Fitz-Gerald arrived with ten knights, thirty esquires, and a hundred archers ; and being joined by the former adventurers, composed a force which nothing in Ireland was able to withstand. Roderic, the chief monarch of the island, was foiled in different actions; the prince of Ossory was obliged to submit, and give hostages for his peaceable...
Page 170 - Lent, or times of the highest penance; were debarred from all pleasures and entertainments; and were forbidden even to salute each other, or so much as to shave their beards, and give any decent attention to their person and apparel. Every circumstance carried symptoms of the deepest distress, and of the most immediate apprehension of divine vengeance and indignation.
Page 78 - ... knowing the influence of superstition over the minds of the people, and, perhaps, apprehensive that a part of his troubles arose from the displeasure of Heaven, resolved to do penance at the shrine of St.
Page 191 - Staines ; a place which has ever since been extremely celebrated, on account of this great event. The two parties encamped apart, like open enemies ; and after a debate of a few days, the king, with a facility somewhat suspicious, signed and sealed the charter which was required of him. This famous deed, commonly called the Great Charter, either granted or secured very important liberties and privileges to every order of men in the kingdom ; to the clergy, to the barons, and to the people.
Page 128 - Saladin died at Damascus soon after concluding this truce with the princes of the crusade. It is memorable that, before he expired, he ordered his winding-sheet to be carried as a standard through every street of the city ; while a crier went before, and proclaimed with a loud voice, This is all that remains to the mighty Saladin, the conqueror of the East.
Page 178 - ... so effectually disappoint the French invasion, as by thus putting himself under the immediate protection of the apostolic see. John, lying under the agonies of present terror, made no scruple of submitting to this condition.
Page 169 - ... infants, and the communion to the dying: the dead were not interred in consecrated ground: they were thrown into ditches, or buried in common fields; and their obsequies were not attended with prayers or any hallowed ceremony Marriage was celebrated in the...
Page 204 - Lynn to Lincolnshire, his road lay along the seashore, which was overflowed at high water; and not choosing the proper time for his journey, he lost in the inundation all his carriages, treasure, baggage, and regalia. The affliction for this disaster, and vexation from the distracted state of his affairs, increased the sickness under which he then laboured; and though he reached the castle of Newark, he was obliged to halt there, and his distemper soon after put an end to his life [Oct.
Page 234 - ... person, to make his eldest son a knight and to marry his eldest daughter once; and for these purposes only a reasonable aid is to be levied.

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