An Entire & Complete History, Political & Personal of the Boroughs of Great Britain: To which is Prefixed an Original Sketch of Constitutional Rights, from the Earliest Period Until the Present Time...

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Page 162 - That no person who has an office or place of profit under the King, or receives a pension from the Crown, shall be capable of serving as a Member of the House of Commons.
Page 153 - That levying money for or to the use of the crown, by pretence of prerogative, without grant of parliament, for longer time, or in other manner, than the same is or shall be granted, is illegal.
Page 154 - And that for redress of all grievances, and for the amending, strengthening, and preserving of the laws, parliaments ought to be held frequently.
Page 217 - I grant that every child shall be his father's heir, after his father's days; and I will not suffer any person to do you wrong. God keep you.
Page 154 - And they do claim, demand and insist upon all and singular the premises, as their undoubted rights and liberties; and that no declarations, judgments, doings or proceedings, to the prejudice of the people in any of the said premises, ought in any wise to be drawn hereafter into consequence or example.
Page 31 - Committee had directed him to report to the Houfe ; which he read in his place, and afterwards delivered in at the table, where the fame were read, and agreed to by the Houfe, and are as followeth, viz.
Page 273 - ... conceal through what channel it was conveyed to the electors. A person concealed under a ludicrous and fantastical disguise, and called by the name of Punch, was placed in a small apartment, and, through a hole in the door, delivered out to the voters parcels containing twenty guineas each : upon which they were conducted to another apartment in the same house, where they found a...
Page 273 - ... to another apartment in the same house, where they found a person called Punch's Secretary, who required them to sign notes for the value received ; these notes were made payable to an imaginary character, to whom was given the name of Glenbucket. Two of the witnesses swore that they had seen Punch through the hole in the door, and that they knew him to be Mr. Matthews, an alderman of the town!
Page 173 - But, to obviate all doubts and difficulties concerning this matter, it is expressly declared by statute 12 and 13 W. III. c. 2, "that the laws of England are the birthright of the people thereof : and all the kings and queens who shall ascend the throne of this realm ought to administer the government of the same according to the said laws ; and all their officers and ministers ought to serve them respectively according to the same...
Page 151 - By levying money for and to the use of the Crown by pretence of prerogative for other time and in other manner than the same was granted by Parliament; 5.

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