An Old Man's Thoughts about Many Things

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Bell and Daldy, 1872 - Conduct of life - 379 pages
 

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Page 352 - The tax which each individual is bound to pay ought to be certain, and not arbitrary. The time of payment, the manner of payment, the quantity to be paid, ought all to be clear and plain to the contributor, and to every other person.
Page 352 - subjects of every State ought to contribute towards the support of the government, as nearly as possible, in proportion to their respective abilities, that is, in proportion to the revenue which they respectively enjoy under the protection of the State.
Page 348 - There is no art which one government sooner learns of another than that of draining money from the pockets of the people.
Page 304 - If any of the provinces of the British empire cannot be made to contribute towards the support of the whole empire, it is surely time that Great Britain should free herself from the expense of defending those provinces in time of war, and of supporting any part of their civil or : military establishments in time of peace, and ,' endeavour to accommodate her future views/ and designs to the real mediocrity of her circumstances.
Page 279 - That the National Religion of the country should be made the foundation of national education, which should be the first and chief thing taught to the Poor, according to the excellent Liturgy and Catechism provided by our Church for that purpose.
Page 353 - While the demand for labour and the price of provisions, therefore, remain the same, a direct tax upon the wages of labour can have no other effect than to raise them somewhat higher than the tax.
Page 266 - But when things are matter of public concern, the discipline pertaining to them must also be matter of public concern ; and we must not consider any citizen as belonging to himself, but all as belonging to the state ; for each is a part of the state, and the superintendence of each part has naturally a reference to the superintendence of the whole.
Page 210 - ... and what we ought to do and what we ought not to do, whoever came into the world without having an innate idea of them?

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