The Return

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1997 - Fiction - 193 pages
20 Reviews
Gripping and poignant tale of psychic possession concerns Arthur Lawford, who appears to have been possessed by the spirit of a long-dead 18th-century pirate. One of de la Mare's finest occult stories, the novel also deals with domestic trauma, unrequited love and philosophical reflection. New introduction by S. T. Joshi.

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Review: The Return

User Review  - David - Goodreads

The premise is really exciting for the early 1900s, and there are portions early in that are beautifully written. Slowly, the book turns into a bit of a rambling mess which is more about prolonged conversations and debates. What can I say, I am a reader who is overly fond of plot. Read full review

Review: The Return

User Review  - Goodreads

The premise is really exciting for the early 1900s, and there are portions early in that are beautifully written. Slowly, the book turns into a bit of a rambling mess which is more about prolonged conversations and debates. What can I say, I am a reader who is overly fond of plot. Read full review

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About the author (1997)

Born in a Kent village, Walter de la Mare was born on April 25, 1873. He was an English poet, short story writer and novelist. He is probably best remembered for his works for children and for his poem "The Listeners". His 1921 novel Memoirs of a Midget won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction and his post-war Collected Stories for Children won the 1947 Carnegie Medal for British children's books. De la Mare's first book, Songs of Childhood, was published under the name Walter Ramal. He worked in the statistics department of the London office of Standard Oil for eighteen years to support his family, but nevertheless found time to write. De la Mare suffered from a coronary thrombosis in 1947 and died of another in 1956. His ashes are buried in the crypt of St Paul's Cathedral, where he had once been a choirboy.

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