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'make him any amends for his sad ca- • boured and invidious defences, where ' taltrophe.

• the clemency of the judge is ever on The truth is, the forum (that single the side of the accused Believe me, remain which now survives of amtient then, my worthy (and, as far as the oratory) is, even in it's present situa. circumstances of the age require, my

tion, an evident proof that all things • eloquent) friends, had the gods re. ' aniongit us are not conducted in that overled the date of your exittence, and

well-ordered manner one could wish. placed You in the times of thole an• For, tell me, is it not the guilty or the "tients we fo much admire, and Them • miferable alone, that fly to us for af- ' in yours; You would not have fallen • fistance? When any community im- • fhört of that glorious fuirit which di

plores our protection, is it not because • ftinguished their oratory, nor would

it either is insulted by some neighbour. they have been destinute of a proper 'ing itate, or torn hy domestic feuds? temperature and moderation. But since • And what province ever seeks our pa- a high reputation for eloquence is not

tronage, till she has been plundered consistent with great repose in the * or oppressed? But far better it surely public; let every age enjoy it's own ' is, never to have been injured, than at peculiar advantages, without dero

lait to be redressed. If there was a ' gating from those of a former.' government in the world free from Maternus having ended, Meffalla ob.

commotions and disturbances, the pro- served, that there were some points * fession of oratory would there be as which his friend had laid down, that ' useless, as that of medicine to the were not perfectly agreeable to his fenti• sound: and as the physician would ments; as there were others, which he

have little practice or profit among the wished to hear explained more at large' healthy and the strong, fo neither would But the time is now,' said he, too • the orator have much business or ho. • far advanced.' - If I have main

nour where obedience and good man- ' tained any thing,' replied Maternus, "ners universally prevail. To what " which requires to be opened more ex

purpose are fiudied speeches in a se. plicitly, I Mall be ready to clear it up • nate, where the better and the major in some future conference.' At the same

part of the allembly are already of one time, rising from his feat and ein• inind? What the expediency of ha- bracing Aper- Messalla and I,' con• ranguing the populace, where public tinued he, smiling, Thall arraign you,

affairs are not determined by the voice ! be well assured, before the poets and • of an ignorant and giddy multitude, I admirers of the antients.' And I

but by the steady witdom of a single • both of you,' returned Aper, ' before • person? To what end voluntary in- ' the rhetoricians.' Thus we parted in

formations, where crimes are unfre. mutual good humour. quent and inconliderable? or of la.

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LETTER LIII.

PAGE . LETTER XLIV: TO PALAMEDES. Againit Visitors by Profeflion,

60 LETTER XLV. TO HORTENSIUS. Reflections upon Fame, with respect to the finall Number of those whose

60 Approbation can be considered as conferring it, . 7

LETTER XLVI. - TO CLYTANDER." Concerning the Reverence due to the Religion of one's Country,

LETTER XLVII. . TO CLEOR A,!

LETTER XLVIII. TO EUPHRONIUS. The public Advantage of weli-directed Såtire. The moral Qualifications requisite to a Satiritt,

LETTER XLIX. TO 'PALAMEDÉS. On his approaching Marriage,

LETTER L. TOEUPHRONIUS, I Upon Good-fense,

LETTER LI. . TO PALEMON,
The Author's Morning Retections,

LETTER LII. TOEUPHRONIUS.
Some Passages ir. Mr. Pope's Translation of the Wiad, compared with the
Versions of Denham, Dryden, Congreve, and Tickel,

TO ORONTES.
Reflections upon seeing Mr. Pope's House at Binfield,

73 LETTER LIV. TO PHIDIPPUS. The Character of Cleanthes,

74 TO EUPHRONIUS. Concerning Weariness of Lite,

75 LETTER LVI. TO TIMOCLEA. With a Fable in the Style of Spenser,

LETTER LVII. TO CLYTANDER. Concerning the Use of the antient Mythology in modern Poetry,

LETTER LVII. TO EUPHRONIUS. Occafioned by the fudrien Death of a Friend,

80 LETTER LIX. TO HORTENSIUS. On the Delicacy of every Author of Genius, with respect to his own Performances,

LETTER LX TO PALEMON. An Account of the Author's Happiness in his Retirement,

82 LETTER LXI. Reflections upon Style,

LETTER LXII. TO ORONTES. The Character of Timoclea, .

LETTER LXIII. TO THE SAME. Concerning the Art of verbal Criticisin; a Specimen of it applied to an Epigrain of Swift,

LETTER LXIV. TO PHILOTES.
From Tunbridge,

LETTER LXV. TO OROXTES.
Concerning Delicacy in relieving the Diftrefled,
LETTER LXVI. TO CLEORA,

88 LETTER

LETTER LV.

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TO EUPHRONIUS.

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