The Irish Bar: Anecdotes, Bon-mots and Biographical Sketches of the Bench and Bar of Ireland

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Harper, 1878 - Law - 59 pages
 

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Page 9 - ... and this soothing hope I draw from the dearest and tenderest recollections of my life, from the remembrance of those Attic nights, and those refections of the gods which we have spent with those admired and respected and beloved companions who have gone before us; — over whose ashes the most precious tears of Ireland have been shed...
Page 21 - I will resist it to the last gasp of my existence and with the last drop of my blood, and when I feel the hour of my dissolution approaching I will, like the father of Hannibal, take my children to the altar and swear them to eternal hostility against the invaders of their country's freedom.
Page 21 - Sir, I, in the most express terms, deny the competency of parliament to do this act. I warn you, do not dare to lay your hands on the constitution. I tell you, that if, circumstanced as you are, you pass this act, it will be a nullity, and that no man in Ireland will be bound to obey it.
Page 58 - I walked through Ballinderry in the Spring-time, When the bud was on the tree ; And I said, in every fresh-ploughed field beholding The sowers striding free, Scattering broadcast forth the corn in golden plenty On the quick seed-clasping soil, Even such, this day, among the fresh-stirred hearts of Erin, Thomas Davis is thy toil...
Page 58 - Even such, this day, among the fresh-stirred hearts of Erin, Thomas Davis is thy toil ! " I sat by Ballyshannon in the summer, And saw the salmon leap ; And I said, as I beheld the gallant creatures Spring glittering from the deep, Through the spray, and through the prone heaps striving onward To the calm clear streams above, So seekest thou thy native founts of freedom, Thomas Davis, In thy brightness of strength and love...
Page 21 - I \vill, like the father of Hannibal, take my children to the altar, and swear them to eternal hostility against the invaders of their country's freedom. Sir, I shall not detain you by pursuing this question through the topics which it so abundantly offers. I...
Page 58 - Thomas Davis, For a nation's rights restored!' And, alas! to think but now, and thou art lying, Dear Davis, dead at thy mother's knee; And I, no mother near, on my own sick-bed, That face on earth shall never see: I may lie and try to feel that I am not dreaming, I may lie and try to say 'Thy will be done' But a hundred such as I will never comfort Erin For the loss of the noble son!
Page 58 - Young husbandman of Erin's fruitful seed-time, In the fresh track of danger's plough ! Who will walk the heavy, toilsome, perilous furrow Girt with freedom's seed-sheets now? Who will banish with the wholesome crop of knowledge The...
Page 21 - He abandoned in his latter years the principle of reform, by professing which he had attained the early confidence of the people of England, and in the whole of his political conduct he has shown himself haughty and intractable ; but it must be admitted that he...
Page 23 - Lord's obloquy which may attach to me or my humble efforts ; but I own I cannot repress my indignation at the audacious boldness of the calumny which would asperse one of the most exalted characters which any nation ever produced, and that in a country which owes its liberties and its greatness to the energy of his exertions. and in the very house which has so often been the theatre of his glorious labours and splendid achievements. I remember that man the theme of universal panegyric — the wonder...

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