Tales of the Fireside

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Hilliard, Gray, Little and Wilkins, 1827 - Children's literature - 225 pages

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Contents

I
7
II
37
IV
51
V
65
VII
79
VIII
89
X
109
XI
127
XII
145
XIII
155
XIV
213

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Popular passages

Page 89 - And there was mounting in hot haste: the steed. The mustering squadron, and the clattering car. Went pouring forward with impetuous speed, And swiftly forming in the ranks of war...
Page 2 - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 109 - To press the weary minutes' flagging wings; New sorrow rises as the day returns, A sister sickens, or a daughter mourns; Now kindred Merit fills the sable bier, Now lacerated Friendship claims a tear; Year chases year, decay pursues decay, Still drops some joy from...
Page 79 - His words are bonds, his oaths are oracles ; His love sincere, his thoughts immaculate ; His tears, pure messengers sent from his heart ; His heart as far from fraud, as heaven from earth.
Page 186 - Ah me! for aught that ever I could read. Could ever hear by tale or history, The course of true love never did run smooth: But, either it was different in blood; Her.
Page 1 - THERE are an hundred faults in this Thing, and an hundred things might be said to prove them beauties. But it is needless. A book may be amusing with numerous errors, or it may be very dull without a single absurdity.
Page 2 - CLERK'S OFFIcE. BE it remembered, that on the eleventh day of November, AD 1830, in the fiftyfifth year of the Independence of the United States of America, Gray & Bowen, of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof...
Page 32 - It were all one, That I should love a bright particular star, And think to wed it, he is so above me: In his bright radiance and collateral light Must I be comforted, not in his sphere.
Page 194 - Oh grief, beyond all other griefs, when fate First leaves the young heart lone and desolate In the wide world, without that only tie For which it loved to live or feared to die...
Page 155 - And lean-looked prophets whisper fearful change. Rich men look sad, and ruffians dance and leap. The one, in fear to lose what they enjoy, The other to enjoy by rage and war. These signs forerun the death or fall of Kings.

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