The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Death of George the Third, Volume 5

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Page 37 - ... for whose sake I am now as I am, whose name I could some good while since have pointed unto, your Grace being not ignorant of my suspicion therein. But if you have already determined of me, and that not only my death, but an infamous slander must bring you the enjoying of your desired happiness ; then I desire of God, that he will pardon your great sin therein, and likewise...
Page 37 - My last and only request shall be, that myself may only bear the burden of your Grace's displeasure, and that it may not touch the innocent souls of those poor gentlemen who, as I understand, are likewise in strait imprisonment for my sake. If ever I have found favour in your sight, if ever the name of Anne Boleyn hath been pleasing in your ears, then let me obtain this request...
Page 35 - God and your grace's pleasure had been so pleased. Neither did I at any time so far forget myself in my exaltation, or received queenship, but that I always looked for such an alteration as...
Page 326 - Christ was the word that spake it, He took the bread and brake it, And what that word did make it, That I believe and take it.
Page 155 - A proclamation was issued, that women should not meet together to babble and talk, and that all men should keep their wives in their houses.
Page 36 - You have chosen me from a low estate to be your queen and companion, far beyond my desert or desire. If then you found me worthy of such honour, good your grace, let not any slight fancy or bad counsel of mine enemies withdraw...
Page 63 - Henry took an effectual method of interesting the nobility and gentry in the success of his measuresp: he either made a gift of the revenues of convents to his favourites and courtiers, or sold them at low" prices, or exchanged them for other lands on very disadvantageous terms. He was so profuse in these liberalities, that he is said to have given a woman the whole revenue of a convent, as a reward for making a pudding which happened to gratify his palate n.
Page 274 - Jane had presence of mind, in those melancholy circumstances, not only to defend her religion by all the topics then in use, but also to write a letter to her sister...
Page 333 - ... as well lodged as the lord of the town : So well were they contented. Pillows, said they, were thought meet only for women in childbed : As for servants, if they had any sheet above them it was well : For seldom had they any under their bodies to keep them from the pricking straws that ran oft through the canvass, and rased their hardened hides.
Page 149 - ... exterior qualities were advantageous, and fit to captivate the multitude : his magnificence and personal bravery rendered him illustrious in vulgar eyes : and it may be said with truth that the English in that age were so thoroughly subdued, that, like eastern slaves, they were inclined to admire those acts of violence and tyranny which were exercised over themselves, and at their own expense.

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