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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on ... if that indeed can be called composition in which all the images rose up before....
" ... if that indeed can be called composition in which all the images rose up before him as things, with a parallel production of the correspondent expressions, without any sensation or consciousness of effort. "
Penny Cyclopaedia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge - Page 141
1837
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Christabel; Kubla Khan, a vision; The pains of sleep, Volume 1

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1816
...during which time he has the most vivid confidence, that he could not have composed less than from two to three hundred lines; if that indeed can be...without any sensation or consciousness of effort. On awaking he appeared to himself to have a distinct recollection of the whole, and taking his pen,...
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The Augustan review

1816
...senses, during which time he has the most vivid confidence that he could not have composed less than from two to three hundred lines; if that, indeed, can be...things, with a parallel production of the correspondent expression, without any sensation or consciousness of effort. On awaking, he appeared to nimself to...
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The Literary Panorama and National Register

English literature - 1816
...lines of poetry — " if that indeed," says be, ' can be called composition, in which all the nuages rose up before him as things, with a parallel production...without any sensation, or consciousness of effort." — On awaking he began to write down these effusions ; but being called off, and detained above an...
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The Poetical Works of S.T. Coleridge: Including the Dramas of Wallenstein ...

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1828
...during which time he has the most vivid confidence, that he could not have composed less than from two to three hundred lines ; if that indeed can be...without any sensation or consciousness of effort. On awaking he appeared to himself to have a distinct recollection of the whole, and taking his pen...
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The poetical works of S.T. Coleridge, including the dramas of ..., Volume 1

Samuel Taylor [poetical works] Coleridge - 1829
...during which time he has the most vivid confidence, that he could not have composed less than from two to three hundred lines; if that indeed can be...composition in which all the images rose up before him as tliingi, with a parallel production of the correspondent expressions, without any sensation or consciousness...
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The Westminster Review, Volume 12

English literature - 1829
...of this composition had almost always happened to him in the production of his poems, viz., that " the images rose up before him as things, with a parallel production of the correspondent expressions." We cannot but believe that usually his " visions flit very palpably before him," from the effect of...
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The Poetical Works of Coleridge, Shelley, and Keats: Complete in One Volume

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - English poetry - 1831 - 607 pages
...wbi.-li (mi'1 he has tho most vivid confidence that he could not have componed 1екч thiui from two lo nil the imageĢ rose UP b<Ttir<j him an things, witli n parallel production of the correspondent expressions,...
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The Philosophy of Sleep

Robert Macnish - Sleep - 1834 - 296 pages
...during which time he had the most vivid confidence, that he could not have composed less than from two to three hundred lines; if that indeed can be...without any sensation or consciousness of effort. On awaking, he appeared to himself to have a distinct recollection of the whole : and taking his pen,...
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The Philosophy of Sleep

Robert Macnish - Sleep - 1834 - 336 pages
...during which time he had the most vivid confidence, that he could not have composed less than from two to three hundred lines ; if that indeed can be...without any sensation or consciousness of effort. On awaking, he appeared to himself to have a distinct recollection of the whole: and, taking his pen,...
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The poetical works of S.T. Coleridge, Volume 1

Samuel Taylor [poetical works] Coleridge - 1834
...during which time he luw the most vivid confidence, that he could not have compound less tlmn from two to three hundred lines ; if that indeed can be called composition in which all the images roso up before him as things, with a parallel production of the correspondent expressions, without...
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