Principles of Political Economy: With Some of Their Applications to Social Philosophy, Volume 2

Front Cover
J. W. Parker and son, 1857 - Economics
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 542 - Laisser-faire, in short, should be the general practice: every departure from it, unless required by some great good, is a certain evil.
Page 325 - There is room in the world, no doubt, and even in old countries, for a great increase of population, supposing the arts of life to go on improving, and capital to increase. But even if innocuous, I confess I see very little reason for desiring it.
Page 325 - ... superfluous tree rooted out, and scarcely a place left where a wild shrub or flower could grow without being eradicated as a weed in the name of improved agriculture. If the earth must lose that great portion of its pleasantness...
Page 557 - There are matters in which the interference of law is required, not to overrule the judgment of individuals respecting their own interest, but to give effect to that judgment; they being unable to give effect to it except by concert, which concert again cannot be effectual unless it receives validity and sanction from the law.
Page 369 - The certainty of what each individual ought to pay is, in taxation, a matter of so great importance, that a very considerable degree of inequality, it appears, I believe, from the experience of all nations, is not near so great an evil as a very small degree of uncertainty.
Page 368 - The subjects of every state ought to contribute towards the support of the government, as nearly as possible, in proportion to their respective abilities; that is, in proportion to the revenue which they respectively enjoy under the protection of the state.
Page 562 - ... admitted to be right that human beings should help one another ; and the more so, in proportion to the urgency of the need : and none needs help so urgently as one who is starving. The claim to help, therefore, created by destitution, is one of the strongest which can exist ; and there is...
Page 369 - Every tax ought to be levied at the time or in the manner in which it is most likely to be convenient for the contributor to pay it.
Page 244 - Indies, in like manner, are the place* where England finds it convenient to carry on the production of sugar, coffee, and a few other tropical commodities. All the capital employed is English capital ; almost all the industry is carried on for English uses ; there is little production of anything except the staple commodities, and these are sent to England, not to be exchanged for things exported to the colony and consumed by its inhabitants, but to be sold in England for the benefit of the proprietors...
Page 335 - ... that a woman, who does not happen to have a provision by inheritance, shall have scarcely any means open to her of gaining a livelihood, except as a wife and mother. Let women who prefer that occupation, adopt it; but that there should be no option, no other carriere possible for the great majority of women, except in the humbler departments of life, is a flagrant social injustice. The ideas and institutions by which the accident of sex...

Bibliographic information