Catholicon anglicum: an English-Latin wordbook, dated 1483, Volume 32

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Sidney John Hervon Herrtage
Early English Text Society, 1881 - English language - 432 pages
 

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Page x - Thus within a yeere, or two, they had gathered together a great volume, which (for the apt similitude betweene the good Scholers and diligent Bees in gathering their waxe and honie into their Hiue...
Page 147 - At Wednesbury in Staffordshire, the colliers going to their pits early in the morning hear the noise of a pack of hounds in the air, to which they give the name of Gabriel's Hounds, though the more sober and judicious take them only to be wild geese making this noise in their flight.
Page 83 - Chrisome (a xplia [to anoint — with the holy oil formerly used in baptism]) signifies properly the white cloth which is set by the minister of baptism upon the head of a child newly anointed with chrism after his baptism. Now it is vulgarly taken for the white cloth put about or upon a child newly christened, in token of his baptism ; wherewith the women use to shroud the child, if dying within the month ; otherwise it is usually brought to church at the day of purification.
Page 166 - Bussel, who keep the method of preparing it as a secret ; it is of a brownish colour. However, I am informed by a physician, a native of that place, that the preparation is made of malt almost burnt in an iron pot, mixed with some of the barm which rises on the first working in the keeve, a small quantity of which invigorates the whole mass, and makes it very heady.
Page 277 - ... and other engine, which he. shall find used or laid, or in the possession of any person fishing in any river or fishery, without the consent of the owner or occupier thereof.
Page 39 - Scotland two kinds of hunting-dogs, and no where else in the world : the first kind is called ane rache (Scotch), and this is a foot-scenting creature, both of wild beasts, birds, and fishes also, which lie hid among the rocks : the female thereof in England is called a brache. A brach is a mannerly name for all houndbitches.
Page 82 - Shirley's Works, vol. iv. p. 298 : Nares (in his Gloss.) quotes what follows from Blount's Glossography : " Chrisome (a xflu [to anoint — with the holy oil formerly used in baptism]) signifies properly the white cloth which is set by the minister of baptism upon the head of a child newly anointed with chrism after his baptism : now it is vulgarly taken for the white cloth put about or upon a child newly christened, in token of his baptism ; wherewith the women use to...
Page 262 - Hie docet autor quod fungus habet duas significationes. Nam fungus id est boletus : anglice paddokstole. Vel est quedam avis, anglice an ostrich: quia ut aliqui dicunt est ilia qui comedit ferrum, i. ferreos claves: anglice horsenayles. a 1275 JOANNES I>E GARLANUIA, Liber sEquivocorttm Vocabularum.
Page xxix - Yokes, forks, and such other, let bailiff spy out, and gather the same, as he walketh about; And after, at leisure, let this be his hire, to beath them and trim them, at home by the fier.

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