Report of the Committee of the African Institution, Volume 2

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Printed by Ellerton and Henderson, 1812 - Slave trade
 

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Page 20 - Articles, which, though they may afford advantagcous modes of employing the labour of Africa, yet will not furnish an export to Europe ; such as SALT, which is now manufactured to a small extent on the Sea Coast, (for the purpose of supplying the interior where it is in high demand,) and the quantity of which might be much enlarged ; and the fruit of the COLA Tree, so famed for its tonic qualities, as to be carried by the Satees or travel Jing merchants, from the neighbourhood of Sierra Leone, to...
Page 19 - Gambia : the number will doubtless encrease, as cattle can be more securely reared. SPONGE- may also be procured thence. But besides the articles above enumerated, as already existing in Africa, there are others of a very valuable kind, such as OPIUM, which might easily be transported thither. The COCHINEAL and the SILK WORM might also be reared there. In short, it may be said that there are no articles, produced between the tropics, which may not be naturalized in that part of Western Africa, which...
Page 13 - ... universally acquainted, although the particular species of cotton grown there, (and from which they manufacture cloth of an excellent fabric) is so unsuitable to the English market, that the price which it would obtain would not repay the expence of raising it, and conveying it to this country. As the natives of Africa, however, are already familiarized to the culture of cotton ; as it requires only six or seven months from the time of sowing the seed to bring it to maturity ; and as the process...
Page 44 - ... are attached to him in consequence of his ability to supply them with all necessaries, and to support him, right or wrong, against all who would injure or punish them. At their head, he can domineer over any of the petty chiefs with their two or three dozens of subjects ; he can make war upon them, or force them to make war upon others. " War, as carried on by the natives, depopulates the country in an extraordinary degree. To give no quarter to an enemy...
Page 37 - At the same time it is of first rate importance, that encouragement should be given to her manufactories for home consumption. The Africans may go on purchasing daily by their field industry more and more European luxuries, yet remain nearly as barbarous and as ignorant as ever ; but if they can be taught to desire decent apparel, and comfortable habitations, innumerable blessings will spring up from these humble shoots. Habits of domestic virtue, order, and happiness, habits of self-estimation,...
Page 16 - It might of course be greatly encreased by encouraging the rearing of Bees. DYE- WOODS, of various kinds, including CAMWOOD, BARWOOD, and FUSTICK, are now exported, the two first in considerable quantities from Africa. Requiring no previous cultivation, but only to be cut down in order to be brought to market, and thus affording a present temptation to exertion, the commerce in articles of this description, has not been equally affected by the Slave Trade, as the commerce in those articles which...
Page 42 - Besides which, the natives near the sea have another way of finding gold, as thus : in the rainy seasons, after a wet night, the sea shore is generally covered with people, mostly women, each having a couple of bowls or platters made of callabashes ; the largest of which they fill with earth and sand, such as is driven down from the mountains by violent floods in the rivers and brooks, &c. This they wash with many waters, by often turning the bowl round, till it washes over the brims. The gold, if...
Page 15 - It is important to be preparing sources from which a supply of cotton may be drawn, should circumstances arise to interrupt our commercial relations with America, or with the other places which now furnish it. But independently of these considerations it may be presumed, that in proportion as the natives of Africa supply us with the raw material, they will be capable of paying for a larger quantity of the manufactured article. The Committee think that it may be of use to enumerate in this place,...
Page 18 - ... quantity nearly equal to the demand. Besides these, there are many other gums in Africa, which, if properly examined, might prove useful, both to our manufacturers and chemists. Gums, as was observed in the case of Dye -Woods, require no cultivation, and hardly any labour to prepare them for market. PALM OIL, which is useful in the manufacture of soap, may be obtained in considerable quantities. INDIGO grows wild in almost every part of the African Coast, and might therefore easily be brought...
Page 18 - ... most valuable article of commerce, is so abundant, that it grows wild even in the streets of Freetown ; and which, when once planted, can scarcely ever be rooted out. Capital could not be wanting to employ in a settlement, where, according to the 2d Report, p. 12, "several varieties of COFFEE, oneof a kind not inferior, it is supposed, to the Mocha, are found growing wild in the mountains of Sierra Leone," — so superior to other coffee, in fact, that (see 7th Report, p.

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