The History of the Stockton and Darlington Railway and Its Various Branches ...

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Stokesley, Tweddell and sons, 1869
 

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Page 24 - Is it for a man's health to travel with tired jades, to be laid fast in the foul ways, and forced to wade up to the knees in mire ; afterwards sit in the cold, till teams of horses can be sent to pull the coach out...
Page 24 - Restoration, a diligence ran between London and Oxford in two days. The passengers slept at Beaconsfield. At length, in the spring of 1669, a great and daring innovation was attempted. It was announced that a vehicle, described as the Flying Coach, would perform the whole journey between sunrise and sunset. This spirited undertaking...
Page 39 - ... let me most seriously caution all travellers who may accidentally purpose to travel this terrible country to avoid it as they would the devil, for a thousand to one but they break their necks or their limbs by overthrows or breakings down.
Page 30 - IVhichurch, twenty miles ; the second day, to the Welsh Harp; the third, to Coventry; the fourth, to Northampton ; the fifth, to Dunstable ; and, as a wondrous effort, on the last, to London before the commencement of night. The strain and labor of six good horses, sometimes eight, drew us through the sloughs of Mireden, and many other places. We were constantly out two hours before day, and as late at night ; and in the depth of winter proportionably later.
Page 24 - York, or further west than Exeter. The ordinary day's journey of a flying coach was about fifty miles in the summer ; but in winter, when the ways were bad and the nights long, little more than thirty. The Chester coach, the York coach, and the Exeter coacli generally reached London in four days during the fine season, but at Christmas not till the sixth day.
Page 39 - They will here meet with ruts which I actually measured, four feet deep, and floating with mud, only from a wet summer — what, therefore, must it be after a winter ? The only mending it receives in places is the tumbling in some loose stones, which serve no other purpose but jolting 1 a carriage in the most intolerable manner.
Page 38 - I know not, in the whole range of language, terms sufficiently expressive to describe this infernal road. Let me most seriously caution all travellers who may accidentally propose to travel this terrible country, to avoid it as they would the devil, for a thousand to one they break their necks or their limbs by overthrows or breakings down.
Page 24 - ... a flying coach was about fifty miles in the summer; but in winter, when the ways were bad and the nights long, little more than thirty. The Chester coach, the York coach, and the Exeter coach generally reached London in four days during the fine season , but at Christmas not till the sixth day. The passengers, six in number, were all seated in the carriage. For accidents were so frequent that it would have been most perilous to mount the roof. The ordinary fare was about twopence halfpenny a...
Page 31 - Hence the loud city's busy throngs Urge the warm bowl and splendid fire ; Harmonious dances, festive songs, Against the spiteful heaven conspire. Meantime, perhaps with tender fears, Some village-dame the curfew hears, While round the hearth her children play ; At morn their father went abroad ; The moon is sunk, and deep the road ; She sighs, and wonders at his stay.
Page 24 - Petworth, and did not get out of the coaches, save only when we were overturned or stuck fast in the mire, till we arrived at our journey's end. 'Twas...

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