Liverpool as it was During the Last Quarter of the Eighteenth Century: 1775 to 1800

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J. Mawdsley and son, 1853 - Liverpool (England) - 558 pages
 

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Page 163 - London, the town council of any borough for the time being subject to the act of the session of the fifth and sixth years of the reign of King William the Fourth, chapter seventy-six, intituled " An Act to provide for the Regulation of Municipal Corporations in England and Wales...
Page 194 - In witness whereof the master or purser of the said ship hath affirmed to three bills of lading all of this tenor and date, the one of which three bills being accomplished, the other two to stand void. And so God send the good ship to her desired port in safety. Amen, dated in London the day of September, 7679 George Churchey.
Page 31 - I've seen enough of thee And now am careless what thou say'st of me Thy smiles I court not nor thy frowns I fear My cares are past my head lies quiet here What faults you saw in me take care to shun And look at home enough there's to be done...
Page 147 - An Act to settle and describe the divisions of counties and the limits of cities and boroughs in England and Wales, in so far as respects the election of members to serve in Parliament...
Page 77 - Henry, by the grace of God, King of England, Lord of Ireland, Duke of Normandy and Aquitain, and Earl of Anjou ; to the archbishops, bishops, abbots, priors, earls, barons, justices, sheriffs, reeves, ministers, and all his bailiffs and faithful...
Page 173 - Third, by the grace of God of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth, and in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four.
Page 53 - ... beneath, he could only have distinguished a few insulated patches of culture, each encircling a village of wretched cabins, among which would still be remarked one rude mansion of wood, scarcely equal in comfort to a modern cottage, yet then rising proudly eminent above the rest, where the Saxon lord, surrounded by his faithful cotarii, enjoyed a rude and solitary independence, owning no superior but his sovereign.
Page 141 - Defender of the Faith &c., and in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and ninety five.
Page 194 - And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Page 68 - Description of the Country from Thirty to Forty Miles round Manchester.

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