Penn's Treaty with the Indians

Front Cover
This book walks through William Penn's famous treaty with the Lenape Indians.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - Their order is thus: The King sits in the middle of an half-moon, and has his council, the old and wise, on each hand. Behind them, or at a little distance, sit the younger fry in the same figure. Having consulted and resolved their business, the King ordered one of them to speak to me. He stood up, came to me, and in the name of...
Page 19 - This great God hath written his law in our hearts, by which we are taught and commanded to love and help and do good to one another — Now this great God hath been pleased to make me concerned in your part of the world, and the King of the country where I live hath given me a great province therein, but I desire to enjoy it with your love and consent, that we may always live together as neighbours and friends, else what would the great God do to us...
Page 61 - Acknowledgg. the Authority of the Crown of England and Government of this Province. ITEM, that none of the said Indians shall at any time be Aiding, Assisting or Abetting...
Page 90 - Yet midst the relic's sainted space, A health-restoring blood shall spring, In which the angel-form of Peace May stoop to dip her dove-like wing. So once the staff the prophet bore, By wondering eyes again was seen To swell with life through every pore, And bud afresh with foliage green. The withered branch again shall grow, Till o'er the earth its shade extend — And this— the gift of foe to foe — Becomes the gift of friend to friend.
Page 20 - ... any shall offend you or your people, you shall have a full and speedy satisfaction for the same, by an equal number of just men on both sides, that by no means you may have just occasion of being offended against them. " I shall shortly come to see you myself, at which time we may more largely and freely confer and discourse of these matters. In the mean time I have sent my Commissioners to treat with you, about land, and a firm league of peace.
Page 20 - But I am not such a man, as is well known in my own country. I have great love and regard towards you, and I desire to win and gain your love and friendship by a kind, just and peaceable life...
Page 18 - That all differences, between the planters and the natives, shall also be ended by twelve men, that is, by six planters and six natives...
Page 17 - And forasmuch, as it is usual with the planters to over-reach the poor natives of the country, in trade, by goods not being good of the kind, or debased with mixtures, with which they are sensibly aggrieved, it is agreed, whatever is sold to the Indians, in consideration of their furs, shall be sold in the...
Page 45 - But as there are wicked people in all nations, if either Indians or Christians should do any harm to each other, complaint should be made of it by the persons suffering, that right...
Page 60 - On the first Arrival of the English in Pennsylvania, Messengers from this Tribe came to welcome them, with Presents of Venison, Corn, and Skins; and the whole Tribe entered into a Treaty of Friendship with the first Proprietor, William Penn, which was to last "as long as the Sun should shine, or the Waters run in the Rivers.

Bibliographic information