Readings in the History of Education: A Collection of Sources and Readings to Illustrate the Development of Educational Practice, Theory, and Organization

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin, 1920 - Education - 684 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Athens in the Time of Pericles
12
The Instruction of the Sophists
13
An Example of SocratesTeaching
15
The Schools of Alexandria
18
What we owe to the Greeks
20
The Education and Work of Rome Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
23
The Laws of the Twelve Tables
24
Importance of the Twelve Tables in Education
25
A Roman Farmers Calendar
26
The Grave and Severe Character of the Life of the Earlier Roman
27
The Old Roman Education described
28
The Old and the New Education contrasted
30
Attempts to prohibit the Introduction of Greek Higher Learning at Rome a Decree of the Roman Senate 161 b c
33
Difficulty in learning to read illustrated by a Page from
34
The Education given by a Father 36
37
On Oratory
38
Privileges granted to Physicians and Teachers
39
The Rise and Contribution of Christianity Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
40
Educational Maxims from
41
Saint Paul to the Romans
42
Saint Paul to the Athenians
43
a Octavius The Roman Point of View
44
The Persecution of the Christians as Disloyal Citizens of the Empire a Pliny to Trajan
45
b Trajan to Pliny
47
Edicts of Diocletian against the Christians
48
The Empire and Christianity in Conflict
49
The Edict of Toleration of Galerius
50
The Faith of Catholic Christians
51
How the Catechumens are to be in structed
52
Catechumenal Schools of the Early Church
53
Christians should abstain from All Heathen Books
54
The Nicene Creed of 325 a d
56
Enforcing Lenten Reading in the Monasteries
59
New Peoples in the Empire Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
64
The Hunting Germans and their Fighting Ways
65
The Germans and their Domestic Habits
66
Effect on the Roman World of the News of the Sacking of Rome by Alaric
67
Fate of the Old Roman Towns
68
The Invaders and what they brought
69
General Form for a Grant of Immunity to
72
Powers and Immunities granted to the Mon astery of Saint Marcellus
73
Education during the Early Middle Ages I Condition and Preservation of Learning Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
75
Three Old Monastic Forms a Form for offering a Child to a Monastery
76
b The Monastic Vow
77
Work of a Monk in writing and copying Books
78
Work of a Nun in copying Books
80
Scarcity and Cost of Books
82
Anathemas to protect Books from Theft
83
On Education in Early England a The Learning of Theodore
84
c How Albinus succeeded Abbot Hadrian
85
Catalogue of the Cathedral Library at York
86
Specimen of PalaceSchool Instruction
87
On sending out a Collection of Edited Sermons
88
General Proclamations as to Education
89
a The Proclamation of 787 a d
90
b The Proclamation of 789 A D
91
Letter to Charlemagne asking for Books 796 A D
92
State of Learning in England
94
Alfred obtains Scholars from abroad
96
Education of the Son of King Alfred
97
Education during the Early Middle Ages II Schools established and Instruction provided Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
99
Song and Grammar Schools in England
100
The Episcopal and Monastic Schools
102
The School of Salisbury Cathedral
104
Foundation Grant for a Chantry School
105
The Seven Liberal Arts
106
A Mediaeval Latin Colloquy Ill 76 Quintilian On the Importance of Grammar
113
The Elements and the Planets a Of the Elements
115
A TenthCentury Schoolmasters Books
116
The Truce of God
117
How the Church used Chivalry
120
Educational Influences of the Church Services
123
How the Church urged that the Ele ments of Religious Education be given
124
a Northallerton Appointment of Master of Song and Grammar School
125
Influences tending toward a Revival of Learn ing Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
127
The Moslem Civilization in Spain
129
Learning among the Moslems of Spain
131
Works of Aristotle known by 1300 a d
135
On Aristotles Greatness
136
How Aristotle was received at Oxford
137
How Aristotle was received at Paris a Decree of Church Council 1210 a d
138
Abelards Sic et Non a From the Introduction
139
The Great Work of the Schoolmen
140
The Early Mediaeval Town a To the Eleventh Century
142
6 By the Thirteenth Century
144
An English Town Charter
145
Oath of a New Freeman in a Mediaeval Town
146
Ordinances of the WhiteTawyers Guild
147
Report on School of Guild of Saint Nicholas
149
An Indenture of Apprenticeship
150
The Rise of the Universities Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
152
a In Theology 172
153
Table of Dates of University Foundations before 1600
154
Privileges for Students who travel for Study
156
Privileges granted the Students at Paris
157
Charter of the University of Heidelberg
159
Exemption of Masters and Students from Taxation at Paris
162
Cost to a City of maintaining a University
164
A Cessatio at Oxford
165
Early Licensing of Professors to teach
166
A University License to teach
167
Books required for the Arts Degree
168
Books required for the Arts Degree
169
Books required for the Arts Degree
171
d In Medicine
174
On the Teaching of Theology
175
Books left by Will to the University at Paris
176
The Scarcity of Books on Morals
177
Methods of Instruction in the Arts Faculty at Paris
178
TimeTable of Lectures 1309 a d
179
Value and Influence of the Mediaeval University
182
The Revival of Learning Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
186
On copying a Work of Ciceros
187
Boccaccios Visit to the Library of Monte Cassino
188
Finding of Quintilians Institutes of Oratory at Saint Gall
189
a Letter of Poggio Bracciolini on the Find
190
b Reply of Lionardo Bruni
191
Founding of the Medicean Library at Florence
193
Founding of the Ducal Library at Urbino
194
Founding of the Vatican Library at Rome
197
The New Learning at Oxford
199
The New Taste for Books
201
Educational Results of the Revival of Learning Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
203
On teaching the Classical Authors
205
The College de Guyenne at Bordeaux
207
Course of Study at Strassburg
210
Statutes for Saint Pauls School London
213
a Religious Observances
214
c The Course of Study
215
On Queen Elizabeths Learning
216
Bequest for Sevenoaks Grammar School
217
Bequest for a Chantry Grammar School
218
A City GrammarSchool Foundation
221
Course of Study in 1560
223
The Degeneracy of Classical Instruction
224
The Revolt against Authority Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
226
On the Enemies of Christ
227
Attack the Pope and the Practice of Indulgences
228
List of Church Abuses demanding Re form
230
Illustrations from his NinetyFive Theses
231
On the Treatment of Heresy
233
The English Act of Supremacy
235
Educational Results of the Protestant Re volts I Lutherans and Anglicans Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
236
Diffusion of Education in Mediaeval Times
237
Vernacular Style of the Translations of the Bible
239
Letter to the Mayors and Magistrates of Germany
241
On the Dignity and Importance of the Teachers Work
243
On the Duty of compelling School Attendance
244
An Example of a Lutheran Kirchenordnung
245
Saxony Plan of 1528
247
School System established in WUrtemberg
249
The Schulemethode of SaxeCoburgGotha
251
The Careful Supervision of the Teachers Acts and Religious Beliefs in England a Letter of Queens Council on
255
Penalties on NonConforming Schoolmasters
256
Oath of a GrammarSchool Master
259
GrammarSchool Statutes regarding Prayers
260
Effect of the Translation of the Bible into English
261
Ignorance of the Monks at Canterbury and Mes senden
263
Origin of the English Poor Law of 1601
267
The PoorRelief and Apprenticeship Law of 1601
268
Educational Results of the Protestant Revolts II Calvinists and Catholics Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
272
Scheme of Christian Education adopted
273
Work of the Dutch in developing Schools
276
Character of the Dutch Schools of 1650
279
Scotch School Law of 1646
280
The Ratio Studiorum of the Jesuits
281
Dominant Religious Purpose in the Education of French Girls
282
Educational Results of the Protestant Revolt III The Reformation and American Education Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
285
The Puritan Attitude
287
The Founding of Harvard College
290
First Rules for Harvard College a Entrance Requirements
292
c Schedule of Studies
293
d Requirements for Degrees
294
b The Brown College Charter of 1764
295
Rules for the New Haven Hopkins Grammar School
296
The Massachusetts Law of 1642
298
The Massachusetts Law of 1647
299
The Connecticut Law of 1650
300
Plymouth Colony Legislation
301
Contract with a Dutch Schoolmaster
303
Rules regulating a Schoolmaster in
305
The Credulity of Mediaeval People
318
How he arrived at the Theory he set forth
320
Galileos Discovery of the Satellites of Jupiter
321
The Abjuration of Galileo
323
On Scientific Progress
324
The Importanoe of Bacons Work
325
The New Scientific Method and the Schools Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
328
On the Nature of Education
330
Statement of the Aim and Purpose of Education
331
His Program for Study
332
Discontent of the Nobility with the Schools
335
Ridicule of the Humanistic Pedants
336
His Conception of Education
337
Extracts from his Thoughts on Education
339
Plan for WorkingSchools for Poor Children
343
TitlePage of the Great Didactic
346
Table of Contents of the Great Didactic
347
Plan for the Gymnasium at SarosPatak
348
Sample Pages from the Orbis Pictus
351
Place of Comenius in the History of Education
355
Need for Realschulen for the New Classes to be edu cated
356
A Cambridge Scheme of Study of 1707
357
How the Scientific Studies were begun at Cambridge
358
Theory and Practice by the Middle of the Eighteenth Century Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
360
On the Teaching of Latin
364
On the Bible as a Reading Book
365
Two Early Spelling Books
366
Description of PreRevolutionary Schools
368
Teachers in Gotha in 1741
369
An EighteenthCentury Swedish Peoples School
370
Schools of FrankfurtamMain in Eighteenth Cen tury
371
A Swiss Teachers Examination in 1793
372
The English DameSchool de scribed
374
A ParochialSchool Teachers Agreement
377
CharitySchool Organization and Instruction a Qualifications for the Master
379
a Books proper to be used in CharitySchools
381
6 Lewiss Exposition of the Christian Catechism
382
A CharitySchool Subscription Form
383
The CharitySchool of Saint Johns Parish
384
Learning the Trade of a Schoolmaster
386
The Schools of Germany before Pestalozzi
387
FreeSchool Rules 1734
389
A New Jersey School Lottery
390
The Eighteenth a Transition Century Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
392
Ecclesiastical Tyranny in France
393
Relations of Church and State
395
The Social Contract a Political Inequality
396
6 Theological and Civil Intolerance
397
Changes in English Thinking in the Eighteenth Cen tury
398
Bill of Rights in
400
The Cahiers of 1789
403
The Declaration of the Rights of Man
405
The Beginnings of National Education Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
408
The Farreaching Influence of Rousseaus Writings 4 09
409
Essay on National Education
410
Outline of Plan for organizing Public Instruction
412
Founding of the Polytechnic School at Paris
414
An EighteenthCentury Indenture of Apprentice ship 385
415
Work of the National Convention in France a Various Legislative Proposals
416
6 The Law of 1795 organizing Primary Instruction
418
Early Constitutional Provisions relating to Education
419
Educational Provisions of the First Constitution
423
Educational Provisions of the First Constitution
424
Early School Legislation in
425
Plan for organizing Education in Virginia
427
New Theory and SubjectMatter for the Ele mentary School Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
429
Instruction in Basedows Philanthropinum
436
A Page from the Elementarwerk
438
Explanation of his Work
439
A Visit to Pestalozzi at Yverdon
442
An Estimate of Pestalozzis Work 444
444
On Pestalozzi
445
Pestalozzi and Basedow compared
446
Hofwyl as seen by an American
449
National Organization in Prussia Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
455
Organizing Work of Frederick William I
456
The School Code of 1763
458
The Silesian School Code of 1765
466
The School Code of 1774
473
Addresses to the German Nation
479
The Prussian Elementary Teacher and his Training
480
Prussian Schools and Teachers as he found them
484
Report on Education in Prussia
485
The Military Aspect of Prussian Education
487
National Organization in France Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
490
Founding of the School of Arts and Trades
491
Refounding of the Superior Normal School
492
Recommendations for Education in France
493
Address on the Law of 1833
497
Principles underlying the Law of 1833
499
Letter to the Primary Teachers of France
501
Guizots Work as Minister of Instruction
503
A Lay School for a Lay Society
504
Moral and Civic Instruction replaces the Religious
506
The Struggle for National Organization in England Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
508
CharitySchool Education described
509
Cost and Support of CharitySchools
512
Description of the Gloucester Sunday School 514
514
Organization Support and Work of a Ragged School
516
On the Instruction of the Common People
518
On National Education
521
The School of Lancaster described
522
Automatic Character of the Monitorial Schools
525
The First Parliamentary Grant for Educa tion
527
On the Duty of the State to provide Education
528
Evils of apprenticing Children of Paupers
529
Typical Reasoning in Opposition to Free Schools
531
The Duke of Newcastle Commission Report
532
The Elementary Education Act of 1870
534
Abolition of Religious Tests for Degrees at the English Universities
535
The Educational Traditions of England
536
Awakening an Educational Consciousness in the United States Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
542
The Schools of Boston about 17901815
543
Petition for Free Schools 1799
546
Rules and Regulations for the Schools in 1820
548
A Memorial for Better Schools 1837
549
Beginnings of Public Education in New York City
551
Advantages of the Monitorial System
553
Establishment of Primary Schools in Boston
554
The ElementarySchool System in 1823
555
Report of WorkingMens Committee on Schools
558
The American Battle for Free State Schools Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
561
The Ground of the FreeSchool System
562
Repeal of the Connecticut School Law
565
On the Repeal of the Connecticut School Law
567
The Struggle for Free Schools in Norwich Connecti cut
568
The State and Education
570
A RateBill and a Warrant for Collection
573
On Religious Instruction in the Schools
575
Petition for a Division of the School Funds
576
CounterPetition against Division
578
Act of Incorporation of Norwich Free Academy
579
Establishment of the First American High School
580
The SecondarySchool System in 1823
583
The HighSchool Law of 1827
585
An Example of the Opposition to High Schools
586
The Kalamazoo Decision
587
Program of Studies at the University 184344
589
The Michigan State System of Public Instruction
591
Education becomes a National Tool Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
593
Constitutional Provisions as to Education and Religious Freedom
594
The Basic Documents of Japanese Education a Preamble to the Education Code of 1872
595
c Instructions as to Lessons on Morals
596
The Transformation of China by Education
597
The Recent Progress of Science
600
Scientific Knowledge must precede Invention
603
Lack of Intercommunication illustrated
604
The Struggle for National Realization
605
The French Teacher and the National Spirit
608
The German Emphasis on National Ends
612
Landing of the Pilgrims at Manilla
614
New Conceptions of the Educational Pro cess Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
617
The German Seminaries for Teachers
618
A German Teachers Seminary described
619
A French Normal School described
621
Beginnings of Teacher Training in England
623
The PupilTraining System described
626
Recommendations for TeacherTraining Schools
627
Organizing the First State Normal Schools a The Organizing Law
628
Importance of the Normal School
630
Examples of Instruction from a Davenport History of the United States
631
Elements of Geography Map
632
Elements of Geography Text
633
The Elementary Schools of Berlin in 1838
634
Grading the Schools of
636
Herbarts Educational Ideas
641
Herbart and Modern Psychology
644
Froebels Educational Views 64s 359 Huxley English and German Universities contrasted
648
MidNineteenth Century Elementary Education in England
651
MidNineteenth Century Secondary Education in England
653
What Knowledge is of Most Worth?
655
Conclusions as to the Importance of Science
659
The Old and New Psychology contrasted
661
Difficulties in Transforming the School a Relating Education to Life
663
i The Old Teacher and the New System
664
New Tendencies and Expansions Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
667
The Environmental Influence of the State
668
German Secondary Schools and Ger man National Needs
669
The University and the State
672
tion
675
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 44 - Then certain philosophers of the Epicureans, and of the Stoics, encountered him. And some said, What will this babbler say? other some, He seemeth to be a setter forth of strange gods : because he preached unto them Jesus, and the resurrection.
Page 92 - Awake, O north wind; and come, thou south; Blow upon my garden, That the spices thereof may flow out. Let my beloved come into his garden, And eat his pleasant fruits.
Page 534 - It shall not be required as a condition of any child being admitted into or continuing in the school, that he shall attend or abstain from attending any Sunday school, or any place of religious worship, or that he shall attend any religious observance or any instruction in religious subjects in the school or elsewhere...
Page 425 - It shall be the duty of the General Assembly, as soon as circumstances will permit, to provide, by law, for a general system of education, ascending in a regular gradation from township schools to a State University, wherein tuition shall be gratis, and equally open to all.
Page 596 - Our good and faithful subjects, but render illustrious the best traditions of your forefathers. "The way here set forth is indeed the teaching bequeathed by Our Imperial Ancestors, to be observed alike by Their Descendants and Subjects, infallible for all ages and true in all places. It is Our wish to lay it to heart in all reverence, in common with you, Our subjects, that we may all thus attain to the same virtue.
Page 43 - ROMANS p)AUL, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated unto the gospel of God, (which he had promised afore by his prophets in the holy scriptures,) concerning his Son Jesus Christ our Lord, which was made of the seed of David according to the flesh, and declared to be the Son of .God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead...
Page 332 - The end then of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith, makes up the highest perfection.
Page 263 - In the name of God amen. The 1 st day of September in the 36th year of the reign of our sovereign lord Henry VIII by the grace of God King of England, France and Ireland, defender of the faith and of the church of England and also of Ireland, in earth the supreme head, and in the year of our Lord God 1544.
Page 402 - ... of his vicinage, without whose unanimous consent he cannot be found guilty ; nor can he be compelled to give evidence against himself; that no man be deprived of his liberty except by the law of the land, or the judgment of his peers.
Page 257 - I, AB, do declare that it is not lawful, upon any pretence whatsoever, to take arms against the King ; and that I do abhor that traitorous position of taking arms by his authority against his person, or against those that are commissioned by him...

Bibliographic information