A Practical and Familiar View of the Science of Physiognomy

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S. Curtis, 1819 - Electronic books - 328 pages

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Page 224 - In peace, there's nothing so becomes a man, As modest stillness, and humility : But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger ; Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood, Disguise fair nature with hard-favour'd rage: Then lend the eye a terrible aspect ; Let it pry through the portage of the head...
Page 224 - Swill'd with the wild and wasteful ocean. Now set the teeth and stretch the nostril wide; Hold hard the breath, and bend up every spirit To his full height. On, on, you noblest English...
Page 229 - O fairest of creation, last and best Of all God's works ! creature, in whom excell'd Whatever can to sight or thought be form'd, Holy, divine, good, amiable, or sweet!
Page 224 - Disguise fair nature with hard-favour'd rage: Then lend the eye a terrible aspect; Let it pry through the portage of the head. Like the brass cannon; let the brow o'erwhelm it. As fearfully as doth a galled rock O'erhang and jutty his confounded base, Swilled with the wild and wasteful ocean.
Page 224 - Archangel: but his face Deep scars of thunder had intrenched, and care Sat on his faded cheek, but under brows Of dauntless courage, and considerate* pride Waiting revenge. Cruel his eye, but cast Signs of remorse and passion...
Page 146 - Canst thou make him afraid as a grasshopper? »the glory of his nostrils is terrible. He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength: he goeth on to meet the armed men. He mocketh at fear, and is not affrighted ; neither turneth he back from the sword. The quiver rattleth against him, the glittering spear and the shield. He swalloweth the ground with fierceness and rage : neither believeth he that it is the sound of the trumpet. He saith among the trumpets, "Ha, ha!" and he smelleth the battle...
Page 146 - Hast thou given the horse strength ? Hast thou clothed his neck with thunder ? Canst thou make him afraid as a grasshopper ? The glory of his nostrils is terrible. He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength : He goeth on to meet the armed men. He mocketh at fear, and is not affrighted ; Neither turneth he back from the sword.
Page 239 - The poet's bays and critic's ivy grow : Cremona now shall ever boast thy name, As next in place to Mantua, next in fame...
Page 244 - Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent ; Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part, As full, as perfect in a hair as heart ; As full, as perfect in vile man that mourns, As the rapt seraph that adores and burns. To Him no high, no low, no great, no small ; He fills, He bounds, connects and equals all.
Page 229 - Grace was in all her steps. Heaven in her eye, In every gesture dignity and love.

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