The Ancient British Drama ...

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Walter Scott
W. Miller, 1810 - English drama - 614 pages
 

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Page 117 - I cry hourly with feebler and feebler outcry to be delivered — it were enough to make him dash the sparkling beverage to the earth in all the pride of its mantling .temptation; to make him clasp his teeth — " And not undo 'em To suffer WET DAMNATION to run through 'em.
Page 197 - The learned Greek, rich in fit epithets, Blest in the lovely marriage of pure words ; The Chaldee wise, the Arabian physical, The Roman eloquent, and Tuscan grave, The braving Spanish, and the smooth-tongued French— Tragedy and Comedy.
Page 442 - I have so bent my thoughts to husbandry, That I protest I scarcely can remember What a new fashion is ; how silk or satin Feels in my hand. Why, pride is grown to us A mere, mere stranger. I have quite forgot The names of all that ever waited on me.
Page 103 - tis true, an old man's twice a child ; Mine cannot speak ; one of his single words Would quite have freed my youngest dearest son From death or durance, and have made him walk With a bold foot upon the thorny law, Whose prickles should bow under him ; but 'tis not, And therefore wedlock- faith shall be forgot : I'll kill him in his forehead ; hate, there feed ; That wound is deepest, though it never bleed.
Page 19 - Pietro. Out upon him ! He writ of Temperance and Fortitude, yet lived like a voluptuous epicure, and died like an effeminate coward.
Page 445 - Booty you play; I like a loser stand, Having no heart, or here or in my hand. I will give o'er the set; I am not well. Come, who will hold my cards?
Page 537 - As for Maister Greene, all that I will speak of him (and that without flattery) is this (if I were worthy to censure) there was not an actor of his nature, in his time, of better ability in performance of what he undertook, more applauded by the audience, of greater grace at the court, or of more general love in the city.
Page 319 - I have heard that this is observed amongst them, that by how much the nobler a woman is, by so much the higher are her chapineys. All their gentlewomen, and most of their wives and...
Page 87 - em, madam and her malkin, they are like to bite o' the bridle for William, as the poor horses have done 25 all this while that hurried 'em, or else go graze o' the common. So should my Dame Touchstone too ; but she has been my cross these thirty years, and I'll now keep her to fright away sprites, i'faith.
Page 437 - You, sister, are my friend ; And flying you, I shall pursue my end. Susan. Your company is as my eyeball dear ; Being far from you, no comfort can be near. Yet fly to save your life : what would I care, To spend my future age in black despair, So you were safe ? And yet to live one week Without my brother Charles, through every cheek My streaming tears would downwards run so rank...

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