The inn-play

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Page 8 - Whoever would be a complete wrestler,' says Sir Thomas, • must avoid being overtaken in drink, which very much enervates, or, being in a passion at the sight of his adversary, or having received a fall, in such cases he is bereaved of his senses, not being master of himself is less of his art, but sheweth too much play, or none at all, or rather pulleth, kicketh, and ventureth beyond all reason and his judgment when himself.
Page 18 - Take him by the right hand with your left, your palm being upwards, as if you designed only to shake him by the hand in a friendly manner in the beginning, and twist it outwards, and lift it upwards to make way for your head, and put your head under his right arm-pit, and hold his...
Page 6 - ... lectures, for which I thank him, though I was Fellow Commoner, and seldom, if ever, any such were called to them. But when I went to Gray's Inns of Court, and applied myself to the several masters of the academy, to learn fencing and vaulting, I met with Mr. Cornish (by name) my Inn.Play Wrestling-master; and when I found so much variety in the several holds, that it was impossible to remember half of them, without committing them to paper, and telling him my design, he said, he had taught five...
Page 13 - ... ver. 24, Jacob wrestled with an angel. Whether it was real and corporeal, or mystical and spiritually in its signification, I leave Pool and the rest of the divines to determine. " But I advise all my scholars to avoid wrestling with angels ; for though they may maintain the struggle till break of the day, and seem to lay their adversaries supine and on their backs, they will have the foil, and be out of joint with Jacob's thigh.
Page 19 - Of the two clamps, the Black-clamp is the most to our taste. " Back-clamp. " When your adversary back-clamps you, which is, when he claps his heel in your ham, with a design to throw you backwards, fall in close to him with your arms about him; as for the gripes, bear upon him with your breast and chin, and kick your own breech with your own heel, with his feeble heel in your fort ham, and his head and shoulders will come to the ground first, that throwing him out of the line of direction.
Page 6 - ... digestion, to support nature and maintain strength only. Whilst at Westminster I could not learn any thing, from their irregular and rude certamina or struggles ; and when I went to Cambridge, I then, as a spectator, only observed the vast difference betwixt the Norfolk Out-Players, and the Cornish Huggers, and that the latter could throw the other when they pleased. I do confess the small knowledge I shew to have in my several pieces of architecture, &c. with my useful hydraulics, and the use...
Page 18 - ... hand down to your left side, hold your head stiff backwards, to hold him out of his strength, then put your right arm up to the shoulder between his grainings, and let your hand appear behind past his breech...
Page 4 - Parkyns,' as he called it, to ' be put up in the chancel of his church, that he might look upon it and say, What is life ? In his monument, as in all things else, wrestling was not neglected. His figure was carved in a moralizing posture, in his chancel of the church of Bunny, being the first posture of wrestling ; an emblem of the divine and human struggle for the glorious mastery.' Such is the description of this remarkable
Page 20 - The Pinnion is rather difficult to work ; but " The Gripes," " The Gripes. " Are nothing but laying your right arm amongst his small ribs, and putting your left hand to your right arm, to augment your strength in griping; and, when you gripe, get your head on the outside of his arm, then may you lift the better. Never delay the gripe, but get that as soon as you can, and hold him strait, and your head close to his breast, that he doth not give you his elbow, and stand low, with your knees bent and...
Page 32 - Buttock and Inn-lock" are great ; but our readers will have had enough for one exercise. On " Out-play" Sir Thomas writes with evident coldness and disgust. He dismisses the whole art in two feeble and careless pages. We conclude with the following singular directions to the boxer. " Boxing. " By all means have the first blow with your head or fist at his breast, rather than at his face, which is half the battle, by reason, it strikes the wind out of his body. " If you have long hair, soap it :...

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