Historical and Descriptive Account of the Caricatures of James Gillray: Comprising a Political and Humorous History of the Latter Part of the Reign of George the Third. By Thomas Wright and R. H. Evans

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Page 151 - Nothing is more certain than that our manners, our civilization, and all the good things which are connected with manners and with civilization, have in this European world of ours depended for ages upon two principles, and were indeed the result of both combined: I mean the spirit of a gentleman and the spirit of religion.
Page 132 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the...
Page 391 - The cloud-capt towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself; * Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like the baseless fabric of a vision, Leave not a wreck behind.
Page 151 - Learning paid back what it received to nobility and to priesthood; and paid it with usury, by enlarging their ideas and by furnishing their minds. Happy if they had all continued to know their indissoluble union and their proper place! Happy if learning, not debauched by ambition, had been satisfied to continue the instructor, and not aspired to be the master! Along with its natural protectors and guardians, learning will be cast into the mire and trodden down under the hoofs of a swinish multitude.
Page 342 - And they said : Go to, let us build us a city and a tower, whose top may reach unto heaven, and let us make us a name, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth.
Page 130 - Where, taming thought to human pride, The mighty chiefs sleep side by side. Drop upon Fox's grave the tear, 'Twill trickle to his rival's bier ; O'er PITT'S the mournful requiem sound, And Fox's shall the notes rebound. The solemn echo seems to cry, " Here let their discord with them die. Speak not for those a separate doom Whom Fate made Brothers in the tomb ; But search the land of living men, Where wilt thou find their like agen?
Page 187 - Of all species of rhetoric, of every kind of eloquence that has been witnessed or recorded, either in ancient or modern times; whatever the acuteness of the bar, the dignity of the senate, the solidity of the judgment-seat, and the sacred morality of the pulpit, have hitherto furnished, nothing has equalled what we have this day heard in Westminster Hall.
Page 438 - Below, we are introduced into the interior of the Academy, where the luckless seven occupy the foremost seats, deeply immersed in studying the merits of the new discovery. The ghost of Sir Joshua Reynolds rises up from the floor, contemplates the scene with astonishment, and apostrophises the groups in the words of Shakspeare, — " Black spirits and white, blue spirits and grey, Mingle, mingle, mingle, — you that mingle may...
Page 130 - For talents mourn, untimely lost, When best employ'd, and wanted most ; Mourn genius high, and lore profound, And wit that loved to play, not wound ; And all the reasoning powers divine, To penetmte, resolve, combine ; And feelings keen, and fancy's glow,— They sleep with him who sleeps below...
Page 314 - ... the specimens preserved of his most celebrated speeches show too much of the exaggeration and excess to which those are peculiarly liable who seek by art and effort what nature has denied. By the constant part which Mr. Canning took in debate, he was called upon to show a knowledge which Sheridan did not possess, and a readiness which that accomplished man had no such means of strengthening and displaying. In some qualities of style Mr.

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