The works of lord Byron, Volume 4

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Page 61 - They never fail who die In a great cause : the block may soak their gore ; Their heads may sodden in the sun ; their limbs Be strung to city gates and castle walls — But still their spirit walks abroad. Though years Elapse, and others share as dark a doom, They but augment the deep and sweeping thoughts Which overpower all others, and conduct The world at last to freedom.
Page 165 - TO THE ILLUSTRIOUS GOETHE A STRANGER PRESUMES TO OFFER THE HOMAGE OF A LITERARY VASSAL TO HIS LIEGE LORD, THE FIRST OF EXISTING WRITERS, WHO HAS CREATED THE LITERATURE OF HIS OWN COUNTRY, AND ILLUSTRATED THAT OF EUROPE.
Page 141 - DOGE turns and addresses the Executioner. Slave, do thine office ! Strike as I struck the foe ! Strike as I would Have struck those tyrants ! Strike deep as my curse ! Strike — and but once ! [The DOGE throws himself upon his knees, and as the Executioner raises his sword the scene closes.
Page 400 - The government may exult over the repression of petty tumults ; these are but the receding waves repulsed and broken for a moment on the shore . while the great tide is still rolling on and gaining ground with every breaker.
Page 61 - We must forget all feelings save the one, We must resign all passions save our purpose, We must behold no object save our country, And only look on death as beautiful, So that the sacrifice ascend to heaven, And draw down freedom on her evermore.
Page 358 - Sorrow preys upon Its solitude, and nothing more diverts it From its sad visions of the other world Than calling it at moments back to this. The busy have no time for tears. liar. And therefore You would deprive this old man of all business ? Lor. The thing's decreed. The Giunta and " the Ten " Have made it law — who shall oppose that law ? Bar.
Page 282 - Let's not unman each other: part at once: All farewells should be sudden, when for ever, Else they make an eternity of moments, And clog the last sad sands of life with tears.
Page 412 - ... but it was very unpleasant, and nearly carried me off, and all that. On Monday, they put leeches to my temples, no difficult matter, but the blood could not be stopped till eleven...
Page 400 - French revolution to every thing but its real cause. That cause is obvious — the government exacted too much, and the people could neither give nor bear more. Without this, the Encyclopedists might have written their fingers off without the occurrence of a single alteration. And the English revolution — (the first, I mean) — what was it occasioned by? The puritans were surely as pious and moral as Wesley or his biographer? Acts — acts on the part of government, and not writings against them,...

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