The Naval History of Great Britain: From the Earliest Times to the Rising of the Parliament in 1779. Describing, Particularly, the Glorious Atchievements in the Last War. Also the Lives and Actions of Illustrious Commanders and Navigators, Volume 5

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Page 169 - In this situation, there is such a choice of difficulties that I own myself at a loss how to determine. The affairs of Great Britain, I know, require the most vigorous measures ; but then the courage of a handful of brave men should be exerted only where there is some hope of a favourable event.
Page 505 - Boston, irritated with a hostile array before her eyes, her concessions, if you could force them, would be suspicious and insecure ; they will be irato animo...
Page 585 - ... would admit of— even the last did not disturb or diminish your spirit and vigour. You had overawed the enemy in their ports— in their chief naval force, till shame perhaps, or desperation, brought them forth at last. You fought .them, subdued them, and, in their confusion and dismay, made those, who could escape, to seek their security in flight and disgrace.
Page 550 - I am further directed to inform your excellencies, that congress are inclined to peace, notwithstanding the unjust claims, from which this war originated, and the savage manner, in which it hath been conducted. They will, therefore, be ready to enter upon the consideration of a treaty of peace and commerce, not inconsistent with treaties, already subsisting, when the king of Great Britain shall demonstrate a sincere disposition for that purpose. The only solid proof of this disposition will be, an...
Page 169 - ... with a view to draw the enemy from their present situation, and bring them if possible to an engagement. This measure, however, was not adopted, until the general...
Page 536 - ... of America and France. Can there be a more mortifying insult? Can even our ministers sustain a more humiliating disgrace ? Do they dare to resent it? Do they presume even to hint a vindication of their honour, and the dignity of the state, by requiring the dismission of the plenipotentiaries of America?
Page 548 - To concur in meafures calculated to difcharge the debts of America, and to raife the credit and value of. the paper circulation. — To perpetuate the common union, by a reciprocal deputation of an agent or agents, from the different ftates, who...
Page 273 - ... him to defray any extraordinary expences of the war, incurred, or to be incurred, for the fervice of the year...
Page 421 - Amiable in private life, as illustrious in public. This gallant and profitable servant of his Country, When he was beginning to reap the harvest Of his toils and dangers, In the full meridian of years and glory, After...
Page 549 - Neither of the two parties shall conclude either truce or peace with Great Britain, without the formal consent of the other first obtained ; and they mutually engage not to lay down their arms until the independence of the United States shall have been formally, or tacitly, assured by the treaty or treaties, that shall terminate the war.

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