History of my life, Volumes 11-12

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Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997 - Biography & Autobiography - 864 pages
Giacomo Casanova was born in Venice in 1725. His parents, both actors, wanted him to become a priest, but their hopes were dashed when, at sixteen, he was expelled from the seminary for immoral misconduct. Probably best-known for his reputation as a womanizer, Casanova was in turn a secretary, a soldier in the Venetian army, a preacher, an alchemist, a gambler, a violinist, a lottery director, and a spy. He translated Homer's Iliad into Italian and collaborated with Da Ponte on the libretto for Mozart's Don Giovanni. He retired in 1785 to the castle of a friend - Count Waldstein of Bohemia - in order to write his memoirs. Because every previous edition of Casonova's Memoirs had been abridged to suppress the author's political and religious views and tame his vivid, often racy, style, the literary world considered it a major event when Willard R. Trask's translation of the complete original text was published in six double volumes between 1966 and 1971. Trask's award-winning translation now appears in paperback for the first time.

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Review: History of My Life, Vols 1-2 (History of My Life)

User Review  - Katie Donaldson - Goodreads

Long book with at times amusing stories of the trouble Casanova finds himself, however i think i expected more of the writing, or work, or something instead Casanova seems to tell his story as one ... Read full review

Contents

am recommended to the Venetian Ambassador by a State Inquis
26
Campomanes Olavides Sierra Morena Aranjues Mengs
37
page
69
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Giacomo Casanova was born in Venice in 1725. His parents, both actors, wanted him to become a priest, but their hopes were dashed when, at sixteen, he was expelled from seminary for immoral misconduct. Probably best-known for his reputation as a womanizer, Casanova was in turn a secretary, a soldier in the Venetian army, a preacher, an alchemist, a gambler, a violinist, a lottery director, and a spy. He translated Homer's Iliad into Italian and collaborated with Da Ponte on the libretto for Mozart's Don Giovanni. He retired in 1785 to the castle of a friend -- Count Waldstein of Bohemia -- in order to write his memoirs.

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