Unifying Geography: Common Heritage, Shared Future

Front Cover
John Anthony Matthews, David T. Herbert
Psychology Press, 2004 - Social Science - 402 pages
It can be argued that the differences in content and approach between physical and human geography, and also within its sub-disciplines, are often overemphasised. The result is that geography is often seen as a diverse and dynamic subject, but also as a disorganised and fragmenting one, without a focus.
Unifying Geography focuses on the plural and competing versions of unity that characterise the discipline, which give it cohesion and differentiate it from related fields of knowledge. Each of the chapters is co-authored by both a leading physical and a human geographer. Themes identified include those of the traditional core as well as new and developing topics that are based on subject matter, concepts, methodology, theory, techniques and applications.
Through its identification of unifying themes, the book will provide students with a meaningful framework through which to understand the nature of the geographical discipline. Unifying Geography will give the discipline renewed strength and direction, thus improving its status both within and outside geography.
 

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Contents

ROOTS AND CONTINUITIES
3
1
17
EXPLORATION DISCOVERY AND THE CARTOGRAPHIC
33
FIELDWORK AND UNITY IN GEOGRAPHY
46
THE POTENTIAL OF GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION
62
THE GREAT DEBATE?
94
TOWARDS
117
HUMAN VULNERABILITY PAST CLIMATIC
144
LANDSCAPE AS FORM PROCESS AND MEANING
224
LANDSCAPE AND CULTURE
240
contributing to realworld
257
NATURAL HAZARDS ON AN UNQUIET EARTH
266
URBANIZATION DEVELOPMENT AND
283
CONSERVATION PRESERVATION AND HERITAGE 505
305
Broader frameworks in theory and practice
319
INDIVIDUALS EMERGENCE
327

INTRODUCTION
163
3
171
A SPATIAL PERSPECTIVE
189
INTRODUCTION
217
A POLITICAL TURN
353
PROSPECTS FOR
369
Index
394
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

John A. Matthews is Professor of Physical Geography and David T. Herbert is Professor of Human Geography at the University of Wales, Swansea.

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