Money in Sixteenth-century Florence

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University of California Press, Jan 1, 1989 - History - 169 pages
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Drawing on the extraordinary wealth of the Florentine archives, Carlo Cipolla reconstructs the monetary system and its development in sixteenth-century Florence under the impact of the massive inflow of silver from Mexico and Peru via Spain and Genoa. His study allows us at last to chart the movements of this American silver after it reached Spain and to assess its impact on the economy and the monetary structure of a European state.

Cipolla also reveals the role of the Ricci family of Florence--a great banking family hitherto virtually ignored by historians--in first fueling a credit boom and then provoking a credit crisis in the Florentine economy of the 1570s and 1580s. Cipolla relates this situation to the economic downturn that characterized the economies of southern Europe in the last three decades of the sixteenth century.

Money in Sixteenth-Century Florence is a major contribution to early modern monetary history.
 

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Contents

Figures
10
The gold scudo of Alessandro de Medici
17
The silver piastra of Cosimo de Medici
23
The Money of Account
27
Secular debasement of Florentine lira di pic
59
Gold Coins
61
Official value of the florinducato and
65
The gold scudo of Francesco de Medici
69
Volume of gold and silver coinages in
85
Graphs
87
The Banking Crisis
101
Epilogue
115
The Report of the Commission of 1597
129
Al Gold coinages 150332 semiannual data
141
A3 Gold coinages 154389 semiannual data
155
Copyright

Mint Issues
77

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About the author (1989)

Carlo M. Cipolla has written many books on economic history, including The Monetary Policy of Fourteenth-Century Florence (University of California Press, 1982). He is Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley.

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