Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Feb 26, 2013 - Biography & Autobiography - 416 pages

In 1962, Maurice Wilkins, Francis Crick, and James Watson received the Nobel Prize, but it was Rosalind Franklin's data and photographs of DNA that led to their discovery.

Brenda Maddox tells a powerful story of a remarkably single-minded, forthright, and tempestuous young woman who, at the age of fifteen, decided she was going to be a scientist, but who was airbrushed out of the greatest scientific discovery of the twentieth century.

 

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User Review  - PDCRead - LibraryThing

Franklin was a renowned scientist in her own right, she established her reputation in X-ray photography starting with coal and moving onto viruses and DNA. She was a feisty character, and in her ... Read full review

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User Review  - greeniezona - LibraryThing

When asked to name women in science, Rosalind Franklin is always high on my list. Yet before reading this book, I knew only the barest facts about her: that she was gifted at x-ray crystallography ... Read full review

Contents

Once in Royal Davids City
3
Alarmingly Clever
13
Once a Paulina
25
Never Surrender
43
Holes in Coal
70
Woman of the Left Bank
87
Seine v Strand
108
Part
117
Escaping Notice
207
The Acid Next Door
217
O My America
233
New Friends New Enemies
249
Postponed Departure
271
Private Health Public Health
286
Clarity and Perfection
295
life after death
311

What Is Life?
119
Joining the Circus
125
Such a Funny Lab
141
The Undeclared Race
168
Eureka and Goodbye
190
NOTES
329
BIBLIOGRAPHY
353
INDEX
368
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Brenda Maddox is an award-winning biographer whose work has been translated into ten languages. Nora: A Biography of Nora Joyce, won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Biography, the Silver PEN Award, and the French Prix du Mailleur Livre Etranger. Her life of D. H. Lawrence won the Whitbread Biography Award in 1974, and Yeats's Ghosts, on the married life of W. B. Yeats, was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize in 1998. She has been Home Affairs Editor for the Economist, has served as chairman of the Association of British Science Writers and is a member of the Royal Society's Science and Society Committee. She lives in London and Mid-Wales.

Bibliographic information