Page images
PDF
EPUB

SCENE III.

105 Dismay not, princes, at this accident.

Dismay a verb neuter.

SCENE IV.

110. To do my duty to my sovereign."

“Sovereign” a trisyllable.

ACT IV. SCENE II.

126. Thy timorous soul."

But a minute before, the speaker, in the tautology of applause, had called Talbot “a man of an invincible, unconquered spirit.

SCENE III.

130.That ever-liring man of memory.

Memory” appears to signify“ renown;" yet it may be “ that man of ever-living, or immortal memory.

SCENE V.

134.

If you love my mother,
Dishonour not her honourable name,

To make a bastard and a slave of me. We meet with this thought in K. Henry V. “ Dishonour not your mothers; now attest “ That those whom ye call fathers did beget you."

SCENE VII.

143. How the young whelp of Talbot's, raging

wood.I believe, for wood, we should read brood.

ACT V. SCENE III.

160. "

If thou wilt condescend to be my.

What ?" « His love." Mr. Steevens's correction appears necessary both to the sense and the metre; if the king loved her, she must be his love; i. e. the object of his love, without any condescension.

SCENE V.

174. So full replete...

This is a strange pleonasm, yet, perhaps, not more justly exceptionable than the familiar one, “ fill full;" “ to fill,” being of itself “ to put-in all that can be contained.”

AA 2

SECOND PART OF

KING HENRY VI.

ACT I. SCENE I.

186. “

I deliver

deliver up the queen To your most gracious hands, that are the

substance Of that great shadow I did represent." Represent, here, may only signify “ exhibit;" and so the sense is good : but I fear “ deputationis implied, and that consequently there is a confusion of ideas between the substance represented, and the shadow representing.

If that, in the second line, be the relative to the king implied, are should be art; but the quarto will direct us, perhaps, to a better reading : “Unto your excellence, that art the substance,”

&c. 195. And common profit of his country !

The metre wants repairing : perhaps thus : The good and common profit of his country !” Then let's make haste away, and look unto the

main.'

1

The words make haste should be omitted, or else the reading of the quarto restored : “ Come sons away, and look unto the main."

SCENE II.

198. We'll both together lift our heads to

heaven; And never more abase our sight so low, As 'to vouchsafe one glance unto the

ground.This thought is introduced in Julius Cæsar:

Young Ambition's ladder, “ To which the climber upward turns his face ; “ But when he once attains the utmost round, He then unto the ladder turns his back, “ Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees

By which he did ascend.” 200. Whereas".

for “where.” In the third act we find " where" for whereas.201, “Here's none but thee, and I."

“ Thee” should be silently corrected in the text to “ thou.”

SCENE III.

206. I would, the college of cardinals.

A syllable is wanting to the metre. We might read:

“I would, the college, now, of cardinals.” 207. “ And in her heart she scorns her poverty.

I suppose this is a typographical error, her (in the second instance) for our.

SCENE IV.

219. "

That I had said and done |

i. e. O that I had said and done. It is optative. 220. False fiend, avoid !

Make a void, by removing yourself; or, as Oliver says to Orlando, “ be nought.” The word, in this neutral use, occurs in other places, as in Cymbeline :

“ Thou basest thing, avoid,”

ACT II. SCENE I.

224.

Fain of climbing high.' There appears to be little need of explanation in this passage, and still less for supposing, as Mr. Steevens does, that fain has a meaning different from the obvious and common one, eagerly desirous. 227.

Thy two-hand sword.The old English warriors used a large twohanded sword, not much unlike the present pink

B. STRUTT. Milton mentions a sword with

“ Fell two-handed sway.”

ing iron.

« PreviousContinue »