Naval and Military Memoirs of Great Britain: From the Year 1727, to the Present Time ...

Front Cover
J. Strachan ..., and P. Hill, Edinburgh, 1790 - Great Britain
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 362 - Sir, that the small part of the campaign, which remains, shall be employed (as far as I am able) for the honour of his Majesty, and the interest of the nation, in which I am sure of being well seconded by the admiral, and by the generals.
Page 246 - ... found, which, partly from the fpecie, and partly from the manner of its being made up, was concluded to be pay for the troops, and therefore detained, together with the corporal and pioneer, and all the little implements of war they had with them.
Page 225 - Guinea should be joined by a sloop and two busses, and make an attempt upon the French settlement in the river Senegal. These ships, however, were detained by contrary winds until the season was too far advanced to admit a probability of success, and therefore the design was postponed. In the beginning of the present year, Mr.
Page 59 - Intrepid'* place. I found the enemy edged away conftantly, and as they went three feet to our one, they would never permit our...
Page 6 - Nation soever, not to transport or carry any Soldiers, Arms, Powder, Ammunition, or other contraband Goods, to any of the Territories, Lands, Plantations, or Countries of the...
Page 376 - I neglected this occasion of acknowledging how much we are indebted for our success to the constant assistance and support received from them, and the perfect harmony and correspondence, which has prevailed throughout all our operations, in the uncommon difficulties which the nature of this country, in particular, presents to military operations of a great extent, and which no army can...
Page 357 - Quebec; that five battalions of regular troops, completed from the best of the inhabitants of the country, some of the troops of the colony, and every Canadian that was able to bear arms, besides several nations of savages, had taken the field in a very advantageous situation; I could not flatter myself, that I should be able to reduce the place. I...
Page 207 - Poleagers for me, I will not do it; and I renounce (as I informed you a month ago I would do) meddling directly or indirectly with any thing whatever that may have relation to your administration, whether civil or military. For I had rather go and command the...
Page 87 - ... either the meaning of the law, or the nature of his offence, they bring him under an article of war, which- according to their own...
Page 72 - The garrison were allowed to march out with all the honours of war ; and at the request of General Bellecombe the regiment of Pondicherry was allowed to retain its colours.

Bibliographic information