Dreams of a Final Theory

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Pantheon Books, 1992 - Science - 334 pages
21 Reviews
From one of the world's most distinguished scientists, the story of the push to discover the fundamental laws of nature. Our new view of the universe reveals that nature's symmetries lie at the core of our understanding. Now Weinberg imagines the shape of a final theory and gives indications that there is something behind the blackboard--a deeper truth foreshadowing a final theory.

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Review: Dreams of a Final Theory: The Scientist's Search for the Ultimate Laws of Nature

User Review  - David Leemon - Goodreads

A wonderful explanation of what science is doing and how science works. Read full review

Review: Dreams of a Final Theory: The Scientist's Search for the Ultimate Laws of Nature

User Review  - Larry Gerovac - Goodreads

Steven Weinberg writes for the everyday reader in this book. No complex mathematical equations, just straight forward thoughts of why physicists are seeking the final theory. Like Hawking believed, to ... Read full review

Contents

PROLOGUE
3
ON A PIECE OF CHALK
19
TWO CHEERS FOR REDUCTIONISM
51
Copyright

12 other sections not shown

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About the author (1992)

Born in New York City, Steven Weinberg was a high school and college classmate of Sheldon Glashow; both attended the Bronx High School of Science and Cornell University. Although Weinberg has made contributions as a theoretical physicist in cosmology, quantum scattering, and the quantum theory of gravitation, he is most widely known for his work with Sheldon Glashow and Abdus Salam, with whom he shared the 1979 Nobel Prize in physics. Weinberg received a share of this honor for his formulation of the theory that unifies the relationship between the weak force and the electromagnetic force, including the capability to predict the weak neutral current. After receiving a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1957, Weinberg held postdoctoral positions at Columbia University from 1957 to 1959, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1959 to 1960, the University of California at Berkeley from 1960 to 1966, Harvard University from 1966 to 1967, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1967 to 1969. He is married to a law professor, and they have one daughter.

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