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A Dreling-Room.
Hangings of Yellow Silk Damask, trimmed with
Silver; with the folowing Paintings:

Joan of Arc, over the Chimney.
Sir Thomas Temple.
Lady Hefter Temple

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A Bed-Chamber.
The Hangings, Bed, Chairs and Ornaments, of
Yellow Damask, the same as in the Dressing-Room ;
with Paintings of,

The Representation of the Holy Lamb.
A Flower Piece. O
Two Landscapes, one over éach Door.

A Drefling-Room. Green Damask, trimmed with Gold, with the fol lowing Paintings.

A Picture over the Chimney, by Rembrant,

Two Saints, St. Laurence, and St. Stephen, one over each Door.

On one side, Orodes ordering melted Gold to be poured into the Mouth of Crassus.

Ont' ! other, two Pieces of Ruins and a Landscape, with Dancing Satyrs, by Paul Brill.

The Rape of Helen, by Thelus.

The Return of Chryseis to her Father, both by Prie maticcio.

A Bed-Chamber. Green Damask Bed, Hangings and Chairs trimmed with Gold.

PAINTING S. 1. An Original Portrait of Oliver Cromwell. 2: A Silenus. 3. A Portrait of Colonel Stanyan.

A Dressing

A Drefling-Room
The Paintings in this Room are,

A Portrait of Rubens's Wife, over one Door, by
Rubens.
Over the other, a Knight of the Bath, by Vandyke.
Cymon and Iphigenia.

THE STATE APARTMENTS

J. The State Gallery Is 70 Feet 9 Inches, by 25 Feet long, and 22

Feet high; With two Marble Chimney-Pieces of Sienna, &c. The Cieling finely ornamented with Paintings and Gilding, by Sclater. Two fine large Marble Tables, with two large Pier-Glasses. - The Walls are adorned with curious Pieces of Tapestry, viz.

1. The Triumph of Diana.
2. The Triumph of Mars,
3. The Triumph of Venus.
4. The Triumph of Bacchus,
5. The Triumph of Ceres.
The Piers are adorned with Trophies.

Two Chimnies, the upper Parts of which are adorned with Gilding and Carving.

1. Representing Mercury condueting Tragic and Comic Poetry to the Hill of Parnaffus.

2. A Goddefs conducting Learning to Truth.

II. The State Dreling-Room
Is 2 24 Feet 8 Inches by 30 Feet, and 19 Feet

4

Inches high ; Hung with Blue Damask, and Chairs and Window Curtains of the same. The. Doors and Ceiling are inely ornamented with Carving and Gilding F 5

The

The Paintings are, A fine Portrait of the late Lord Cobham, by Sir Godfrey Kneller.

Four Conversation Pieces, by Francisco Cippo.

Venus binding the Eyes of a Cupid, and the Graces offering Tribute.

III. The State Bed-Chamber
Is 56 Feet 8 Inches by 25 Feet 10 Inches, and

18 Feet 8 Inches high. The Bed and Ceiling by Signior Borra ; and Pillars of the Corinthian Order: The whole finely carved and gilt.

A Madona from the School of Rubens.

A Picture over the Chimney. A very Curious Chimney-Piece of White Marble, designed by Signor Borra. 1. Two Marble Tables. Two fine large Pier Glasses.

IV. The State Closet, Hung with Crimson Damask.-In it a Picture of the King of Denmark, by Angelica; facing which is a Portrait of La Belle Terroniere, Mistrels to Francis the first, by Leonardo da Vinci.

The Chinese Closet, Wainscoted with Japan and other Ornaments, Presents from the late Prince and Princess of Wales.-The Fur. niture white Satin.

A Passage,
Ornamented with Marble Busts..

a A Grand Stair-Cafe,
Adorned with Paintings of the four Seasons,

The Ceiling represents the rising Sun. Phoebus in his Car.

The Length of the Line through the House 450 Feet: the Offices 450 Feet: the whole Extent is

goo Feet.

THE

THE G AR D E N S.

. A straight Gravel Road, of two Miles in length, leads from Buckingham to a large Corinthian Arch, 60 Feet high, and 60 Feet wide, decorated on each Side with a large Column, from whence appears the Garden-Front of his Lordship’s House, standing on the Summit of a Hill, and encompassed by the Garden and Park. From this Arch, you defcend to the Garden Entrance; but the Road to the House leads through the Arch, in which are Dwelling Rooms for the Keeper, and is beautifully diversified with Hill

, Valley, Lawn, River, and a perpetual Change of Scene arising from the numerous Buildings intermixed with Wood.

At the South Entrance of the Gardens are two Pa. vilions supported by Doric Pillars. Here you have a View of the House, and of the two Rivers on the. Right-band meeting in one Stream, which run into a kind of Bay.

Turning to the Left Hand you descend to Artificial Ruins of a Temple of two River-Gods, covered with Evergreens, and adorned with the Statues.of Fauns, Satyrs, and River-Gods, a beautiful Cascade of three Sheets of Water falls from a River above into a Lake of ten Acres.

The Shepherd's Cove, designed by Kent, is feated in a rising Wood, on the Banks of the Lake; on the Walls of which is engraved the following Monumentai Inscription :

To the Memory

of
SIGNIOR FIDO,
An Italian of good Extraction ;

Who came into England, 'q
Not to bite us, like most of his Countrymen.

But to gain an honeft livelihood,
He hunted not after Fame,
Yet acquired it;
F 6.

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noble and

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Regardless of the Praise of his Friends,

But most sensible of their Love.

Tho' he liv'd amongst the Great,
He neither learnt nor flatter'd any Vice.

He was no Bigot,
Tho' he doubted of nane of the XXXIX Articles.

.' And if to follow Nature
And to respect the Laws of Society

.!.. Be Philosophy,
He was a perfect Philosopher ;

i A faithful Friend,
An agreeable Companion,
...A

loving Husband,
Distinguished by a numerous Offspring,
All which he lived to fee take good Courses.“

. In his old Age he retir'd
: To the Houfe of a Clergyman in the Country,

Where he finished his earthly Race,
And died an Honour and an Example to the whole

Species.

READER,
This: Stone is guildless of Flattery,

For he to whom it is inscrib'd
Cuiu Was not a Man,
GREY-HOUND.

ND.
The TEMPLE dedicated to VENUS, with this Inscription,

VENERI HORTENSI.
It is a square Building with circular Arches and
Wings, designed by Mr. Kent; the Inside is adorned
with Paintings by Mr. Sclater, taken from Spencer's
FAIRY Queen. The Lady is the fair Heliinore. The
Pannel in the Ceiling is adorned with a naked Venus.
Upon the Frize is the following Motto from Catullus.

Nuno amet qui nondum amavit ;

Quique amavit, nunc amet.
Let him love now, who never lov'd before :
Let him who always lov'd, now love the more,

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