Speeches of John Philpot Curran, Esq: With a Brief Sketch of the History of Ireland, Volume 2

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Print. and pub. by I. Riley, 1811 - Ireland
 

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Page 141 - ... an undeserved reproach thrown upon him during his trial, by charging him with ambition, and attempting to cast away for a paltry consideration the liberties of his country ! Why did your lordship insult me?
Page 138 - What have I to say, why sentence of death should not be pronounced on me, according to law ? — I have nothing to say that can alter your predetermination, nor that it will become me to say, with any view to the mitigation of that sentence which you are here to pronounce, and I must abide by.
Page 139 - I should bow in silence, and meet the fate that awaits me without a murmur. But the sentence of the law which delivers my body to the executioner will, through the ministry of that law, labor, in its own vindication, to consign my character to obloquy...
Page 98 - Some trust in chariots, and some in horses : but we will remember the name of the LORD our God. . 8 They are brought down and fallen : but we are risen, and stand upright.
Page 142 - I am charged with being an emissary of France. An emissary of France! and for what end? It is alleged that I wished to sell the independence of my country; and for what end?
Page 145 - If the spirits of the illustrious dead participate in the concerns and cares of those who are dear to them in this transitory life, O, ever dear and venerated shade of my departed father, look down with scrutiny upon the conduct of your suffering son...
Page 141 - My lords, it may be a part of the system of angry justice...
Page 76 - Abercromby, our poor people were surrendered to the licentious brutality of the soldiery, by the authority of the state — you would vainly endeavour to give her a general picture of lust, and rapine, and murder, and conflagration. By endeavouring to comprehend every thing, you would convey nothing.

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