Standards and Variation in Urban Speech: Examples from Lowland Scots

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J. Benjamins Pub., Jan 1, 1997 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 201 pages
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Standards and Variation in Urban Speech is an examination and exploration of the aims and methods of sociolinguistic investigation, based on studies of Scottish urban speech. It criticially examines the implications of the notions 'vernacular', 'standard language', 'Received Pronunciation', 'social class', and 'linguistic insecurity'. Through a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods using examples from comedians' jokes, dialect poetry, formal and informal interviews, and personal narratives, the work illustrates the actual norms that speakers exemplify in various ways.

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Contents

Introduction
1
The rise and fall of the vernacular 719
7
Double standards 2133
21
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Ronald K. S. Macaulay is Emeritus Professor of Linguistics at Pitzer College. He is the author of Language, Social Class and Education (1977), Locating Dialect in Discourse (1991), Standards and Variation in Urban Speech (1997), and Talk that Counts: Age, Gender, and Social Class Differences in
Discourse (OUP, 2005). The first edition of The Social Art was published in 1995.

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