The description of Greece, by Pausanias, tr. with notes [by T. Taylor].

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Page 164 - That adverse gods commit to stern debate The best, the bravest, of the Grecian state. Young as ye are, this youthful heat restrain, Nor think your Nestor's years and wisdom vain. A godlike race of heroes once I knew, Such as no more these aged eyes shall view ! Lives there a chief to match Pirithous' fame, Dryas the bold, or Ceneus...
Page 237 - ... according to, and sometimes contrary to nature. Hence the celestial bodies, which are the first parts of the universe, perpetually subsist according to nature, both the whole spheres, and the multitude coordinate to these wholes; and the only alteration which they experience, is a mutation of figure, and variation of light at different periods. But in the sublunary region, while the spheres of the elements remain on account of their subsistence as wholes, always according to nature...
Page 238 - ... universe, perpetually subsist according to nature, both the whole spheres, and the multitude coordinate to these wholes; and the only alteration which they experience, is a mutation of figure, and variation of light at different periods. But in the sublunary region, while the spheres of the elements remain on account of their subsistence as wholes, always according to nature, the parts of...
Page 325 - Diana grac'd their bloom; And Pallas taught the texture of the loom. But whilst to learn their lots in nuptial love, Bright Cytherea sought the bow'r of Jove; (The God supreme, to whose eternal eye 90 The registers of fate expanded lie) Wing'd Harpies snatch'd th' unguarded charge away, And to the Furies bore a grateful prey.
Page 300 - Proclus shortly after observes, "there is a terrestrial Ceres, Vesta, and Isis, as likewise a terrestrial Jupiter and a terrestrial Hermes, established about the one divinity of the earth, just as a multitude of celestial Gods proceeds about the one divinity of the heavens. For there are progressions of all the celestial Gods into the Earth: and Earth contains all things, in an earthly manner, which Heaven comprehends celestially. Hence we speak of a terrestrial Bacchus and a terrestrial Apollo,...
Page 295 - In all the initiations and mysteries, the gods exhibit many forms of themselves, and appear in a. variety of shapes, and sometimes, indeed, a formless light of themselves is held forth to the view ; sometimes this light is according to a human form, and sometimes it proceeds into a different shape.
Page 320 - Next, where the Sirens dwell, you plough the seas; Their song is death, and makes destruction please. Unblest the man, whom music wins to stay Nigh the cursed shore, and listen to the lay ; No more that wretch shall view the joys of life, His blooming offspring, or his beauteous wife ; In verdant meads they sport ; and wide around Lie human bones, that whiten all the ground...
Page 249 - Thus the sun-stone, by its golden rays, imitates those of the sun ; but the stone called the eye of heaven, or of the sun, has a figure similar to the pupil of an eye, and a ray shines from the middle of the pupil. Thus, too, the lunar stone, which has a figure similar to the moon when horned, by a certain change of itself, follows the lunar motion. Lastly, the stone called helioselenus, ie of the sun and moon, imitates, after a manner, the congress of those luminaries, which it images by its colour.
Page 317 - Atreus' hand, which not with Atreus ends, To rich Thyestes next the prize descends ; And now the mark of Agamemnon's reign, Subjects all Argos, and controls the main.
Page 319 - But when she places herself on the seat of the god, she becomes accommodated to his stable prophetic power ; and from both these preparatory operations, she becomes wholly possessed by the god. And then, indeed, he is present with and illuminates her in a separate manner, and is different from the fire, the spirit, the proper seat, and in short from all the apparent apparatus of the place, whether physical or sacred.

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