Iceland: Its Scenes and Sagas

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Smith, Elder and Son, 1863 - Birds - 447 pages

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Contents

I
xiii
II
xix
III
1
IV
26
V
43
VI
67
VII
85
VIII
99
XIV
205
XV
220
XVI
235
XVII
246
XVIII
278
XIX
297
XX
317
XXI
331

IX
115
X
133
XI
155
XII
171
XIII
184
XXII
344
XXIII
354
XXIV
368
XXV
385

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Page 95 - Above me are the Alps, The palaces of Nature, whose vast walls Have pinnacled in clouds their snowy scalps, And throned Eternity in icy halls Of cold sublimity, where forms and falls The avalanche — the thunderbolt of snow ! All that expands the spirit, yet appals, Gather around these summits, as to show How Earth may pierce to Heaven, yet leave vain man below.
Page 189 - JACK and Jill went up the hill, To fetch a pail of water; Jack fell down and broke his crown And Jill came tumbling after.
Page 203 - ... through all the city, for the space almost of forty days, there were seen horsemen running in the air, in cloth of gold, and armed with lances, like a band of soldiers, and troops of horsemen in array, encountering and running one against another, with shaking of shields, and multitude of pikes, and drawing of swords, and casting of darts, and glittering of golden ornaments, and harness of all sorts. Wherefore every man prayed that that apparition might turn to good.
Page 23 - ... breast, ie a bare spot from which the feathers have fallen off with the heat in hatching; its egg is twice as big as that of a Solan goose, and is variously spotted, black, green, and dark ; it comes without regard 'to any wind, appears the first of May, and goes away about the middle of June.
Page 336 - And in that day will I make a covenant for them with the beasts of the field, and with the fowls of heaven, and with the creeping things of the ground: and I will break the bow and the sword and the battle out of the earth, and will make them to lie down safely.
Page 218 - ... through the driving foamy blast In the depth of the sea, a rock's bare side, I grasped the edge — I was safe at last ! And there hung the cup on its coral brow, Saved from the bottomless depths below ! For the purple darkness of the deep Lay under my feet like a precipice, And though here the ear must in deafness sleep, The eye could look down the sheer abyss, And see how the depths of those waters dark Are alive with the dragon, the snake, and the shark. There, there they clustered in grisly...
Page xlvi - And the right honourable the lords commissioners of his majesty's treasury, his majesty's principal secretaries of state, the lords commissioners of the admiralty, and the judge of the high court of admiralty, and the judges of the courts of vice admiralty. are to take the necessary measures herein, as to them may respectively appertain.
Page 364 - ... rolling about it, and swept off by the breeze to fall in torrents of hot rain. Jets and lines of water tore their way through the cloud, or leaped high above its domed mass. The earth trembled and throbbed during the explosion, then the column sank, started up again, dropped once more, and seemed to be sucked back into the earth.
Page 325 - ... determine their relative strength. When this has been fairly ascertained, they advance to the brink of the precipice; and, taking each other by the tail, the weakest descends first, while the strongest, forming the last in the row, suspends the whole number, till the foremost has reached their prey. A signal is then given, on which the uppermost fox pulls with all his might, and the rest assist him as well as they can with their feet against the rocks; in this manner they proceed from rock to...
Page 364 - Five strokes underground were the signal, then an overflow, wetting every side of the mound. Presently a dome of water rose in the centre of the basin and fell again, immediately to be followed by a fresh bell, which sprang into the air full 40 feet high, accompanied by a roaring burst of steam.

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