The General Stud-book, Containing Pedigrees of Race Horses, &c. &c. from the Earliest Accounts to the Year ... Inclusive, Volumes 1-2

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James Weatherby, 1891 - Horses
 

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Page 388 - King James I. bought of Mr. Markham an Arabian horse, imported from the East by the latter. This horse is reported to have been the first of that breed ever seen in England ; but it would be hard to establish the truth of this assertion.
Page 392 - His first employment was that of a teaser to Hobgoblin, who, refusing to cover Roxana, she was put to the Arabian, and from that cover produced Lath, the first of his get. He was also sire of Cade, Regulus, Blank, etc., and what is considered very remarkable, as well as a strong proof of his excellence as a stallion, there is not a superior horse now on the turf without a cross of the Godolphin Arabian, neither has there been for several years past. He was a brown bay...
Page 392 - Teazer to Hobgoblin, who refusing to cover Roxana, she was put to the Arabian, and from that cover produced Lath, the first of his get. It is remarkable that there is not a superior horse now on the Turf, without a cross of the Godolphin Arabian, neither has there been for many years past.
Page 390 - Molly, extraordinarily highformed mares; Whiteneck, Mistake, Sparkler, and Lightfoot, very good mares, and several middling Galloways, who ran for Plates in the North. He got two full sisters to Mixbury, one of which bred Partner, Little Scar, Soreheels, and the dam of Crab ; the other was the dam of Quiet, Silver Eye, and Hazard.
Page 390 - Galloways. The first of them was only thirteen hands two inches high, and yet there were not more than two horses of his time that could beat him at light weights. Brocklesby, Little George, Yellow Jack. Bay Jack, Monkey, Dangerfield, Hip, Peacock, and Flatface. the first two in good forms, the rest middling; two Mixburys, full brothers to the first Mixbury, middling Galloways; Long Meg, Brocklesby Betty, and Creeping Molly...
Page 389 - Turk, brought into England by the Duke of Berwick, from the siege of Buda, in the reign of James II. He was the sire of Snake, Brisk, Piping-peg, Coneyskins, &c.
Page 391 - Aleppo his brother ; also a white-legged horse of the Duke of Somerset's, full brother to Almanzor. and thought to be as good, but, meeting with an accident, he never ran in public ; Cupid and Brisk, good horses...
Page 391 - ... for Plates in the North. He got two full sisters to Mixbury, one of which bred Partner, Little Scar, Soreheels, and the dam of Crab ; the other was the dam of Quiet, Silver Eye, and Hazard. He did not cover many mares except Mr Curwen's and Mr Pelham's.
Page 388 - Royal Mares: King Charles the Second sent abroad the master of the horse, to procure a number of foreign horses and mares for breeding, and the mares brought over by him (as also many of their produce) have since been called Royal Mares.

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