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Milton expresses it, the sense being variously drawn out from one verse into another. For it is variety and uniformity that makes beauty ; and, for want of this, our riming poets soon tire the ear: for rime necessarily hinders the sense from being variously drawn out from one verse to another. They who avoid this Gothic bondage, are unpardonable, if they don't study this variety, when Shakespeare and Milton have so finely led them

the way

But to treat this matter, concerning his metre, somewhat more exactly: 'tis observed that when the iambic verse has it's just number of syllables, 'tis called acatalectic ; when deficient in a syllable catale&tic ; when a foot is wanting to compleat the dipod, according to the Greek scansion, brachycatale&tic ; when exceeding in a syllable, bypercataleEtic.

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lambic monometer hypercatalectic, of two feet and a semiped.

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Thěn yiēld | thëe cow , ard

Macb.
Lånd prey / on gār | bage

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Ham,

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The lambic dimeter brachycatalectic of three feet. Běā / tús il I lě qūị

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Till then / ēnoūgh | come friends

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Sě prý | thče gõ l with me Macb
if sight | ånd shāpe | bě trúe
whị then I mỹ love | ădiệu. As you like it.
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The lambic dimeter catalectic ; better known by the anacreontic; of three feet and one semiped. Birã, niyeiv l ăspei, das

3 Pătēr nå rū / rå ból bus

3 Něy come | let's go | togē | ther

3 å king 1 of shreds 1 ånd pāt l ches

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Ham. it is l å pēer | less kins | man

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를 ånd all | things ūn i bě come ling

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2 을 Håd i | three eārs ' i'd hear | thee

3 1 들 Macbeth. The jambic dimeter acatalectic, of four feet. ūt prif | cả gēns / mõrtā | liūm

3 4 Hor. in thūn | der light | ning and 1 în rāin

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Macb. The iambic dimeter hypercatalectic, the third measure in the alcaic verse, of four feet and a semiped.

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Nôn rũ | rà quặe 1 Liris quie | ta

3 4 Hor. Hamlet, Act III. å bro | ther's mūr | ther. Práy l i can I not

3 Measure for Measure, Act II. Than beauty could display'd. | But marks me

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4 / 를 Timon of Athens, Act II. Būtyet|they could | hăve wisht|--thěy knēw]not

The iambic tremeter brachycatalectic, of five fęet, which is our common heroic verse. Sŭis , et ip | lă Ro | mă vi | ribüs

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4 5 if thou | håst á ný sound / or ūse / of voice

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5 Ham. The iambic trimeter catalectic, of five feet and a semiped. Mëā | rěni dět in domo lăcūnar 3

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Hor. Bắt tô bé fafe | lý thus | our fears [ {n Bãn | quo 9 3

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5 - 를 Stick deep 1 ånd in his röylältý l of nā, ture

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+ Verses

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Verses of this measure are very frequent, both in Milton and Shakespeare:

The iambic trimeter acatalectic, or ' senarian of six feet. Běā | tủs il 1 lě qui prócūl | négő / tiss 3 4 5

6 Hor. In Measure for Measure, Act II. To have whắt wēl would hāvelwě speak Inot whāt, we mean

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6 Othello.

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I Shakespeare uses this measure frequently in Caliban's speeches, to make them seem more uncouth and affected. Qur editors (for none of 'em seem to me to know any thing of measure) have turn'd them into prose. Tempest, Act II. “ These be fine things, and if they be not sprights. " That's a brave God and bears celestial liquor : 6. I'll kneel to him. “ I'll swear| upon that bottle, I to be I thy true l subject ; “ For th' liquor is not earthly.

[Step. Here swear then. To Caliban giving him drink. How “ escapest thou ? To Trinculo.] " I've seen thee in her ; and I do adore thee * My mis stress shew'd me thee and thy dog and thy bush. L’U fhew thee ev'ry fertile inch o'th'Isle " And I will kiss I thy foot || pry 1 thee be | my God.” Stephano's speech, which I have placed between two hooks, is thus printed in all the editions, “ Here swear then, how " escap'dlt thou." Again Pifol, for the same reason, is

made

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